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How will you pay for escorts in retirement?


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This post is in two parts.

On the one hand, I'm interested in hearing from retirees on the forum. What source of income do you use to fund the hobby? Are you in the "money is no object" camp with more passive income than you know what to do with or are you carefully drawing down your portfolio and still have to budget annually how much you can spend on hiring?

On the other hand, I'm also keen to hear from people like myself who are currently in the working phase of life. How are you factoring in the expenses involved in hiring into your retirement plans? 

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55 minutes ago, Quincy_7 said:

Are you in the "money is no object" camp with more passive income than you know what to do with

Yes. I believe that I should be set for the rest of my life, but people richer than me have lost more than I’ll ever see, so it’s all a roll of the dice and try not to think about the well drying up. 
 

I don’t want kids so I don’t put much stock into estate planning. I have an escort fund that I draw down from. I’d have to really get taken for a ride for it to hit zero.  I’ve budgeted for a few more decades of the hobby.   I anticipate gradually slowing down as I’m turning 40 this year and want a real boyfriend again which is at odds with my hiring trajectory. 

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Speaking as a retiree, I’m also well-placed like @Coolwave35 But unlike him, I’m now 70 and I have a younger boyfriend.

If I were to become single again, it’s unlikely that I would find another attractive young man and so I’d consider hiring. My income exceeds my needs (and my capital is untouched) so financing would not be a problem.

I feel retirees may fall into two camps. I’m still in the first - healthy, able to travel extensively and enjoy life fully - but as the years go by, I may be in the second camp - health conditions, possibly house-bound and not able to travel overseas easily or at all.

I’ve noticed with older friends that it’s difficult to consume and spend more as you age. So perhaps the demand for personal services by retirees will increase markedly. I’m not sure, however, whether many younger men will market themselves to these potential clients. 

Edited by MscleLovr
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I'm deep in working phase with two kids I need to get through college in a couple years.

Retirement planning requires a combination of guaranteed investment returns that you have calculated will pay the necessities of the lifestyle of our choice.

With survival assured, I also have half my resources put into more risky investment strategies. Right now Red-State REITs are hot hot hot. 

So make sure you first have enough to live on and "gamble" your remaining funds. If it pays off, fuck your brains out. If it doesn't ....it's online porn and selfie hand jobs for your future.

Edited by pubic_assistance
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Retired 2013, two modest pensions, and social security.  Occasionally withdraw from 401k.  Home and car paid off. 

My other vice is gambling. Casino and lottery.  Been fortunate to have won some relatively big amounts.  6K-ish was the largest.  About four others were in 3-4K range.  A few a little over a grand.  I used the winnings pre pandemic to pay for the hobby.  

Haven't been to the casino since before the pandemic, nor have I hired.  My winnings stash has dwindled down from a pre-pandemic peak of about 8K to 3K now.  

As I finish up recovery from surgery, I'd like to hire again, but finding now more of my income is for living expenses, and less for discretionary items.

Edited by bashful
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Mid 40s, currently working - not hiring much at all these days.  My vices are light gambling and strippers. 

At the moment, I joke that best case scenario my iBonds will be used for Whiskey and Whores (as in the Grand Budapest Hotel). My current plan is I will not have a mortgage payment to worry about in a decade.  I max out my 401k and IRA.  In the worse case, the iBonds represent the last resort funds to keep me from eating alpo. 

The real question can I push back from full-time work to enjoy quality years in semi-retirement. I'd hate to have saved up all for little real enjoyment. It'll be hard to switch from savings to spending.  My mom's perspective on retirement wealth after her stroke haunt me - what good does this do me now? It can't fix this.   Reminder that you can't take it with you and live while you're healthy too. 

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My philosophy on hiring (I started when I was 35) was the same as for all other kinds of entertainment expense: if I had cash that I didn't need or want for something else, I indulged my lusts. I never considered hiring to be a necessity, so I didn't make any special arrangement to budget for hiring in retirement. I retired relatively early (at 60), and luckily I always had enough money for necessities, plus some left over for pleasures. However, the pleasures that I wanted to spend it on changed as I aged, and I found I got more satisfaction out of spending my extra money on other kinds of entertainment rather than on sex. I stopped hiring altogether when I was 68, not because I couldn't afford it, but because it no longer brought me the kind of emotional payoff that it did when I was younger. I am still sexually attracted to pornstars, but I no longer feel any motivation to do anything about it.

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I spend in the area of about $20k a year on my hobby and have been doing that for a number of years now. I used to spend a considerable amount on strippers and for massages but have curtailed that in the last decade.

I am now 75 and have no children or x to support. What I imagine will dictate my future expenditures on this hobby is my advancing age the most and my health, which is currently good. I no longer do much travel except to Canadian cities as I live in a small town where there are no local providers.

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3 hours ago, Luv2play said:

I spend in the area of about $20k a year on my hobby and have been doing that for a number of years now. I used to spend a considerable amount on strippers and for massages but have curtailed that in the last decade.

I am now 75 and have no children or x to support. What I imagine will dictate my future expenditures on this hobby is my advancing age the most and my health, which is currently good. I no longer do much travel except to Canadian cities as I live in a small town where there are no local providers.

I've actually been toying with the idea of building a 500K stock fund over the next 20 years and using the 4% rule to fund the hobby. I think the 4% rule is too risky for retirement money but for a fund like this the goal would be to exhaust the money in my lifetime obviously.

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2 hours ago, robberbaron4u said:

Save your nickels and you will be popular in your old age. Be mindful, however, that whilst money can  buy attentiveness, it cannot buy love and affection; "johns" that think otherwise suffer from early stage dementia.

Its an interesting concept - I discovered about 45 years ago men in bathhouses who wanted me to say "I love you" to them - I never got confused between good sex and love 

 

Whenever I have hired - I have always understood that I was hiring a sexual experience and their time for that period of time - cuddles and conversation as well .....  but nothing more 

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11 minutes ago, Bargara Leatherboy said:

I discovered about 45 years ago men in bathhouses who wanted me to say "I love you" to them - I never got confused between good sex and love

That happened to me once at a bathhouse years ago.

I came across this adorable kid with silky smooth skin and an ass that wouldn't quit.

A bit smaller than me, I tossed him around the room, pig-fucking him like an animal until he looked up at me and said " I love you ".

Lost my hard-on immediately.

It was just too sad.

 

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On 1/21/2023 at 11:40 AM, Quincy_7 said:

On the other hand, I'm also keen to hear from people like myself who are currently in the working phase of life. How are you factoring in the expenses involved in hiring into your retirement plans? 

I plan to spend more money each year in retirement than I do while I'm working.  I assume that when I retire (1) I'll have more time to spend on hobbies and travel and (2) I'll have an older body so I won't be getting as much mutually recreational sex for free.

Therefore, I have been maximizing contributions to Roth retirement accounts every year since age 17, knowing that it costs more to be old than young.

When I retire at 45, my net pension after taxes will be slightly greater than my net working income after taxes and after retirement savings.  My mortgage will be paid off by then, but I'll start to be responsible for my own healthcare premiums which I anticipate will be about half of my current monthly mortgage.  So, I'll have slightly more discretionary income when retired at 45 than I do now working at 40.  My pension will raise automatically with inflation.

This assumes I do not begin a 2nd career part-time after retirement at 45, even though I probably will.

When I'm 60, I'll start withdrawing 5% of my Roth retirement funds each year.  My retirement funds, together with pension, will almost double my current net income when adjusted for inflation.

I am not going to follow the more conservative 4% withdrawal rule for retirement accounts because I am comfortable with a 75% chance of not outliving my retirement savings instead of 90%, given that I will still have my pension.  I want to spend all my money before I die!  No use leaving good stripper money in the bank.

Edited by Vegas_nw1982
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7 hours ago, Vegas_nw1982 said:

When I retire at 45, my net pension after taxes will be slightly greater than my net working income after taxes and after retirement savings.  My mortgage will be paid off by then, but I'll start to be responsible for my own healthcare premiums which I anticipate will be about half of my current monthly mortgage.  So, I'll have slightly more discretionary income when retired at 45 than I do now working at 40.  My pension will raise automatically with inflation.

That all seems sensible to me @Vegas_nw1982. I retired at 48 (so retired for 22 years) and I’ve enjoyed it hugely. It’s great to retire while you’re still relatively young, energetic and in good health. 
 

I would suggest some caution however. I put some capital aside as a ‘future medical expenses’ fund - it’s impossible to predict when/what illness may strike - and I prioritize staying in good health. Secondly I would estimate your own rate of inflation, rather than rely on the official figures - I spend a lot on travel, hotels and restaurants in normal times and I’ve noticed price increases way ahead of the published rate of inflation - and try to future-proof your living expenses. 

Edited by MscleLovr
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15 hours ago, MscleLovr said:

That all seems sensible to me @Vegas_nw1982. I retired at 48 (so retired for 22 years) and I’ve enjoyed it hugely. It’s great to retire while you’re still relatively young, energetic and in good health. 
 

I would suggest some caution however. I put some capital aside as a ‘future medical expenses’ fund - it’s impossible to predict when/what illness may strike - and I prioritize staying in good health. Secondly I would estimate your own rate of inflation, rather than rely on the official figures - I spend a lot on travel, hotels and restaurants in normal times and I’ve noticed price increases way ahead of the published rate of inflation - and try to future-proof your living expenses. 

I agree. A "catastrophic illness" which requires on-going, skilled nursing, aides, etc, can be devestating in a financial sense. My late mother suffered a debilitating stroke at the age of 96; she suvived another five years. Although she had the "best" health insurance policies available, the cost of at home care was a stunner; home health care service, as covered by medicare, is  minimal "basic need".  To avoid a nursing home scenario, the employment of a part-time RN, aides, physical, vocational, and speech therapists, and a masseuse to keep her limbs agile was necessary; too, as the stroke impacted in her ability to swallow, there were special dietary considerations which neither private insurance or Medicare paid. 

Edited by robberbaron4u
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On 1/21/2023 at 3:42 PM, Coolwave35 said:

Yes. I believe that I should be set for the rest of my life, but people richer than me have lost more than I’ll ever see, so it’s all a roll of the dice and try not to think about the well drying up. 
 

I don’t want kids so I don’t put much stock into estate planning. I have an escort fund that I draw down from. I’d have to really get taken for a ride for it to hit zero.  I’ve budgeted for a few more decades of the hobby.   I anticipate gradually slowing down as I’m turning 40 this year and want a real boyfriend again which is at odds with my hiring trajectory. 

Slowing down at 40 sounds reasonable. Until you hit 40!  Lol. If you have any extra funds in that escort account, can you send them my way?  😉 😆 

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