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A nice Christmas story


foxy
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My mother, who is almost 92, lives in an adult community where the people are in their 70's, 80's and 90's.

 

I went to spend the holiday with her. Christmas morning she said she wanted to show me the decorations in her club house. She got her walker and we headed out. As we were approaching the club house, a well dressed, elderly woman, maybe in her 80's, came out the door.

 

My mother sang out "Merry Christmas Arthur!" They hugged and my mother introduced us. As the woman walked away I said to my mother "How come you called that woman Arthur? That's a funny name for a woman."

 

"Oh, that because Arthur used to be a man. A few months ago he went off for a few weeks and came back as a woman."

 

"Wow, that's pretty unusual for a place like this." I said "How did everyone react?"

 

"Everyone was just fine with it" she said "We all figure, if you can't make yourself happy at our age, you may as well just lay down and die. Look, doesn't the tree look pretty?"

 

Let there be peace on earth.

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What an interesting and touching story.

 

I have not seen that much tolerance in the adult community my mother's condo is in. About 15 years ago, a male gay couple moved in and you would have thought the world had ended. Everyone was in an uproar and the guys eventually left. Last year, I walked into the clubhouse only to find an anti-gay marriage petition on the Bulletin Board. I ripped in down and threw it into the trash. I understand the state of Florida is trying to get another Defense of Marriage proposal on the ballot next year. Despite all this I am frequently amazed at how many gay men and women I see in this sleepy little Florida town. Of course, every once in a while I'll come across some "wacko," like the guy who showed up in a department store wearing see-through gym shorts with woman's sequined underwear underneath! Trust me, it wasn't a pretty picture! LOL

 

Ed

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On a related theme, an old friend of mine with early stage Alzheimer's recently moved into an assisted living facility in a middle class town in Florida. When he lived in the same area in the 1950s, he couldn't live in the town, because he is black. Now he is the first and only black person in the home, and he says the welcome has been remarkable. And, he says ironically, "Everyone remembers my name."

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Foxy your mother rocks! Wish my mom had the same attitude :( But I'm glad you have an open minded and supportive mum, that makes me happy :)

 

Hugs,

Greg

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>What an interesting and touching story.

>

>I have not seen that much tolerance in the adult community my

>mother's condo is in. About 15 years ago, a male gay couple

>moved in and you would have thought the world had ended.

 

Well, the original story was about an established and presumably accepted member of the community. There will be a lot more lenience with the familiar folks. Newcomers in those kinds of communities always face a tough road to acceptance.

 

I've been visiting my Mom in her retirement community a lot and getting to know the neighbors. I was an outsider, and treated as such, until they got to know me. Now that several of them have my email address, they don't think twice about adding me to their dirty jokes mailing lists.

 

Those sweet little old ladies can get downright bawdy! LOL

 

They'll accept almost anything, as long as it's from someone familiar to them.

 

A common topic of conversation is "parking by braille" when one of them is on the cusp of losing driving privileges, but there is never any judgment because they all know their day is coming all too soon. Unless it's an outsider. To an outsider they are decidedly unkind.

 

It's not unlike a message board. :9

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Guest zipperzone

A very touching story and it must feel good for you too to know your mom is in such an accepting community.

 

Unfortunately, I don't think that is the norm.

 

There have been several articles this past year about the difficulty and loneliness faced by gays who, no longer able to look after themselves, end up in "retirement" or "care" facilities. They feel completly isolated and befriended by no one.

 

A prospect that scares the shit out of me.

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I wondered that myself but can only assume that was her decision, Arthur's that is, not my mother's. I also don't know if she actually changed her sex with surgery or just got a new wardobe. Somethings you just don't want to ask your mother, even mine.

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>On a related theme, an old friend of mine with early stage

>Alzheimer's recently moved into an assisted living facility in

>a middle class town in Florida. When he lived in the same area

>in the 1950s, he couldn't live in the town, because he is

>black. Now he is the first and only black person in the home,

>and he says the welcome has been remarkable. And, he says

>ironically, "Everyone remembers my name."

 

Not so ironic considering his name is Blackie.

 

 

I have never seen a purplekow;

I never hope to see one;

I can tell you anyhow;

I'd rather see than be one

 

Help there is a purplekow in my mirror

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