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Do you like your name?


Guest zipperzone
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Guest zipperzone

How many of you guys out there really like the Christian name your parents chose for you. You don't have to reveal your real name, unless you want to, just say if you like it or not.

 

And what name would you choose if you were able to pick a new one today (without the hassle of a legal name change)

 

We're not talking internet screen names here so zipperzone doesn't count.

 

Me? I'd like to be a Logan or a Brock and if I wanted a Biblical name, I'd be partial to Michael.

 

Let's hear from youse guyz.....

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>How many of you guys out there really like the Christian name

>your parents chose for you.

 

LOL I think my Jewish parents would be surprised to know they'd given me a Christian name. Then again, my real name is Jesus Christ Our Lord Goldstein, so maybe that should have been a hint. :p

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Guest zipperzone

>I didn't realize that Logan and Brock were Christian names

>(who was Saint Logan?).

 

It has always been my understanding that the term "Christian name" refers to the first and/or middle name given to you by your parents, as opposed to you "Surname" which is the family name. I never thought the term Christian was being applied in the Biblical sense. If I'm wrong here, change the question to "given name"

 

Sorry for any confusion -:)

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Well, I like my name. It is short, too, but unlike you guys, I have met at least 3 or 4 guys with my same first and last names over the course of several decades. None of them looked like me, though the one I met in college could have been "my long lost twin brother, the handsome one, who was stolen in infancy by the pirates." I've fantaasized about meeting him since I was in third grade. LOL

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I'm happy with my name.

 

I'm even MORE happy that Mom put her foot down. When I was born (so the story goes), everyone said I should have been a Junior because I looked so much like Dad. There was pressure from Grandma.

 

Dad hated his name so much that few people knew it. He went by his middle name his whole life. Mom REFUSED to stick her kid with *both* Junior and his name.

 

Thanks, Mom! :-)

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My parents named their kids based upon how they "thought" it would sound with a title in front (i.e., Dr., Professor, Bishop, etc.). From that perspective my given name was wonderful.

 

However, my first name also had some common nicknames which I hated (such as Stu vs Stewart, Jack vs John, or Matt vs Matthew). My total dislike for the common nickname was so intense that I've legally changed my name and completely dropped my middle name. (Another factor was having a deadbeat relative with a very similar name. I was constantly getting collection calls for him and a local hospital even mixed up our medical records.) x(

 

Not at all sorry I changed my name. Once I win the lottery I'll probably do it again to avoid all my long lost relatives or friends that want a hand-out. Wonder if the courts would have a problem with the name One Finger? ;-)

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Guest josephga

i never really cared much. my real names joe but my aunts uncles and school mates called me joey. one thing i hated was being called joey

to me joey is a little kids name.. but i like the name joseph much better and i started using that name about 5 years ago..

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The term "Christian name" is perfectly good English, although it clearly comes from a time when it was assumed that all English speakers were Christian. One received one's name at baptism. So, although the term is somewhat archaic, it is authentic English. The fact that the English language has been adopted by many other people does not invalidate the original words. I suppose the alternative is the somewhat flatter sounding "first name".

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>The N word was once considered "perfectly good

>English" as well.

>

>Wikipedia seems to defer to the term "Given name"

>which is both more descriptive and less antagonistic to

>non-Christians. (And it's what I always heard growing up.)

>

>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_name

>

>As I Christian I find given name offensive.

I do not see the use of the N word which is now so blasphemous that it dare not speak its name, as equivalent to Christian. However language does evolve and given name may be the commoner phrase of those two though I believe most forms and people would go with first name in preference to either of the others.

 

As for me, I was given a given name at birth, christened with a Christian name sometime later and my first name was my first name though I was never called by it by my family. My father liked his nickname, a variation of our last name and he called me that from my birth, however out of deference to his father who had died when my dad was a boy, I was named after my grandfather. I was not told what my name of record was until I went to school and did not answer to the name I was called. My family rarely addressed me by anything other than my nickname, in school it was granddad's moniker and school friend's called me by the common nickname of my granddad's name.

 

To this day, in certain social situations, I find it difficult to choose which name to use. Given a choice, I would just be Fred.

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Guess I'm the 'odd man out' here----I hated my given name as a child, hated it more as a teen-ager and still don't like it very much as a senior. In my first weekend at college, I slapped a nickname on my name tag, and it stuck---I'm still called that name by my friends and acquaintences from that period. My parents at first were amused when people called my house asking for "Nickname" but eventually refused to call me, telling the callers that none of their sons was called that, and who did they really want.

Perhaps my feelings about my name had more to do with my relationship with my parents that the name----don't you think??

what name(s) would I have preferred? John or Jack---but definitely not Johnny or Jacky.

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Guest Merlin

I hated my first name, so I went to court long ago and changed it and my middle name. It is an easy procedure. You can probably buy the forms from one of the services that sell legal forms.If you don't like your name, get rid of it. Life is too short to have that burden.

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In some Roman Catholic cultures, names of children were supposed to be chosen from the list of saints. In Protestant tradition, the term "Christian name" refers to the name given a child when he or she is baptized.

 

And, do I like the name my parents gave me? No, I hate it, which is why I prefer my nickname.

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Talking about Baptism - My Godfather was so nervous that when he was asked my name he blurted out my whole name, including the middle name that was supposed to be added at Confrimation. So, I did get to choose one of my names. And I do still have two middle names. Which I love!!

BTW, my father and I have the same first name. There is a childish sounding version of it, though I love it when it is sometimes whispered in my ear very gently now, but my Dad was big enough that when I hit the point where I started hating it, he and I just traded names.

And I am not a junior, because, although he, too, had two middle initials (though I don't think he liked it as much as I do), neither of them stand for the same name.

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In Christian cultures, your "Christian name" is the name with which you are baptized, and is supposed to come from the Bible or from some term in Christian theology, such as Grace (my father's Christian name was Christian). Many Americans use the term unthinkingly for anyone's given name, though it sounds bizarre to say that Shlomo is my Jewish friend's "Christian" name.

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I did not like my name as a kid. When I was 12, I had to take my birth certificate to my new school. When I look at it, I realized the name which I had been called by since birth was really my middle name. Seems this was done to keep my grandfather happy since it was his name. When I found out my real first name, I announced to the family that I wished to be called by that name from then on. However, some relatives who do not see me often still call me by my middle name.

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I like my name--and it is fairly common at least it was in the 60's. And I've always liked meeting other people with my name--kind of like instant kinship. One year on my dorm floor in college--I think there were 4 or 5 of us--I thought it was great.

 

I'm 47 and I have mostly heard the term--1st name. If someone had asked me as a child what my Christian name was, I would have denied having one not being Christian.

 

 

Gman

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Guest Merlin

I changed mine because I hated it so much. Always refuse when people ask me what it was. No sense in changing it if I keep telling what it was.

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