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The huge number of calories in some fast food dishes!


Orson Kane
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Thats just revolting. I know it hard to eat right when on the go but one meal being your entire caloric intake is horrifying. I used to be much bigger because I ate really poorly then I began to cook my own meals and exercise and the weight fell off.

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Frankly all addicts have the same problem. It doesn’t make a damn bit of difference if we are talking about a “food addict, a “drug addict” or an “alcohol addict”. The only person who is going to conqueror an addiction is the addict himself or herself. There is absolutely nothing wrong with eating the high caloric foods shown on this post if one indulges oneself once a week. It’s the “food addicts” who do so every day and claim they can’t help themselves because their addiction is an illness – bullshit. I have good friends who are incredibly obese and they are obese because their greatest pleasure in life if over indulging in food. If government do-gooders really believe they can change the eating habits of people by simply posting the calories of all items on menus in both fast food outlets and regular sit down restaurants they are damn fools and kidding only themselves. “Food Addicts” eat exactly what they want to and don’t give a tinkers damn about the number of calories they are consuming. In fact “food addicts” only derive pleasure from eating. They don’t really care about their family and their friends. They also refuse to admit that their addiction will subject them to a multitude of illness and eventually kill them prematurely (from which knowledge they hide). Yea I know I'm mean, cruel and unfeeling.

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Frankly all addicts have the same problem. It doesn’t make a damn bit of difference if we are talking about a “food addict, a “drug addict” or an “alcohol addict”. The only person who is going to conqueror an addiction is the addict himself or herself. There is absolutely nothing wrong with eating the high caloric foods shown on this post if one indulges oneself once a week. It’s the “food addicts” who do so every day and claim they can’t help themselves because their addiction is an illness – bullshit. I have good friends who are incredibly obese and they are obese because their greatest pleasure in life if over indulging in food. If government do-gooders really believe they can change the eating habits of people by simply posting the calories of all items on menus in both fast food outlets and regular sit down restaurants they are damn fools and kidding only themselves. “Food Addicts” eat exactly what they want to and don’t give a tinkers damn about the number of calories they are consuming. In fact “food addicts” only derive pleasure from eating. They don’t really care about their family and their friends. They also refuse to admit that their addiction will subject them to a multitude of illness and eventually kill them prematurely (from which knowledge they hide). Yea I know I'm mean, cruel and unfeeling.
Am I to assume you do not consider any addiction an illness?
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I do NOT!!! I consider it a choice and a bad choice!!! Terminating an addiction is certainly difficult and there is no easy way to do it but only the person with the addiction can do it. Tuberculosis is an illness. Cancer is an illness. Cystic fibrosis is an illness. Those who suffer from these illnesses do not choose to have them. People who eat themselves to obesity have a choice – they can, if and when they choose eat less.

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From the article section on Olive Garden: Garden’s investors – the fund Starboard Value – is now trying to change the situation, believing serving good food is a better strategy than simply serving lots of food. “Extreme portion size is inconsistent with authentic Italian values,” Starboard says.

 

I find that to be so true when I travel to Europe. I'm there for around a month at a time and eat out for most of my meals. My experience is that in Europe I eat better (because of the emphasis on fresh ingredients) without ever being stuffed to the hilt (because the portion sizes aren't enough for three people). Between the portion sizes and the walking, I usually end up losing three pounds by the time I return to the States.

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I want to second what JustaGuy just wrote -- I have spent a good part of my adult life in Europe and I ate out often, and when eating at home imitated what I learned -- I only bought fresh ingredients most days for my meals, choosing from what was fresh in the market that day. I learned to temper the temptation to add salt, finding other aromatic flavors from fresh herbs and spices (and citrus fruits).

 

I put on a LOT of weight when I returned Stateside; now it is a constant battle to lose it, but by returning to what I knew then, and practicing it now, I have succeeded far better than I could have hoped (of course, exercise and working our a few days a week helps too). I used to laugh at the denizens of WHOLE FOODS but no more. By controlling what I ingest, I have a better chance of a longer (and healthier) life, and I avoid most chain restaurants and fast food now.I do feel at times like someone who has 12-stepped through all this as food (and all the additives in it and portion sizes) was definitely an addiction for me.

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I do NOT!!! I consider it a choice and a bad choice!!! Terminating an addiction is certainly difficult and there is no easy way to do it but only the person with the addiction can do it. Tuberculosis is an illness. Cancer is an illness. Cystic fibrosis is an illness. Those who suffer from these illnesses do not choose to have them. People who eat themselves to obesity have a choice – they can, if and when they choose eat less.
I understand your thoughts. These are mine. No one would choose to have cancer or say diabetes, and lets not forget end stage renal disease. However, both of these diseases have significant lifestyle earmarks. When we say "cut down on that salt," we just aren't talking about fluid retention. We are talking about what that fluid retains. Like all the additives we pour into our bodies, (a cancer light switch). Diabetes and renal disease? Both are full of "questionable" lifestyle choices they made before diagnosis. After diagnosis, many continue to make poor choices. I worked with adults in my health career for over 30

yrs. Many hours were spent doing instructions to diabetics and cardiac patients. In addition, I spent two yrs working in dialysis. What health care professionals for the most part believe is, it is our responsibility to give as much information to individual that is out there for their well being. After that, it is a matter of...choices. Addiction...every disease needs to fit a criteria before it is classified as such.

Alcohol and drug addiction fit that criteria. I was surprised to find our that obesity was classified as an illness just in 2013. Now, a bit about about my poly addictions. I have mentioned this on other posts as well. I was born to become an addict. Had close family the were addicted to alcohol and pills. At the age of one started the abuse, and multiple variations of abuse thru about 11. I had a rehab counselor, whom was excellent, say if I didn't have drugs, I probably would have killed myself. I agree to this today. Through all this, got married, have beautiful children, and made a stellar career. Which I still practice. Even though legally separated, both my wife and I still love each other, and my children and I do as well. I went through more that one OD, a few rehab, and prison for my addiction. As far as 12 step programs. I go to a particular group now when I feel the need. There is an elderly gentleman who had been to over 13,000 mtg in his life time. I share his philosophy: "I don't care what method you used, as long as you can get clean." I have also gone the obese route and anorexic (nothing for over 60 days). Was one more entire person at one time. So yes, I believe the addictions and obesity are illnesses. Just like cancer and cystic fibrosis. It's not as easy as Nancy Reagan said..."Just so no." PS: I found a new addiction, and he lives in Chicago. I have no plans to go it rehab to give that one up!!!

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I also love comments that if we just ate like Europeans we would be much healthier. Obesity is growing by leaps and bounds throughout Europe. Yes it is true that many Europeans insist on vine or tree fresh produce but they are having more and more difficulty finding it. They are not about to do themselves the back bend hard field labor required to harvest the products they so desire. Rather that harvesting is left more and more too cheap imported labor. Then as they extol this wonderful produce they loudly lament the growing numbers of non-nationals living in their midst and demand exclusionary policies that will prevent these “undesirable foreigners” (Albanians in Italy, Turks in Germany, Moroccans in Spain, and Algerian and other Middle Easterners in France for example) from overwhelming their countries – sound familiar.

 

I also find it amusing how many people claim that if we all shopped at the Whole Foods and Mother’s type markets we would be so much healthier. Nonsense one can eat just as healthy shopping at the standard old supermarkets – Albertsons, Costco, Kroger, Safeway, or Walmart. It is NOT a matter of where one buys ones food but rather WHAT one buys. The major problem is that as a whole Americans have become LAZY – they simply don’t want to spend the time cooking. It is so much easier to stop on the way home from work and buy fast food or stop at a Fairway type marked and buy pre-prepared food to zap it in the microwave. Study after study has shown that people who eat at home and cook their own food from “scratch” are healthier and leaners than those who don’t.

 

As far as obesity is concerned it is time and more that we stop making excuses and start facing some harsh, mean and cruel facts.

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I also love comments that if we just ate like Europeans we would be much healthier. Obesity is growing by leaps and bounds throughout Europe. Yes it is true that many Europeans insist on vine or tree fresh produce but they are having more and more difficulty finding it. They are not about to do themselves the back bend hard field labor required to harvest the products they so desire. Rather that harvesting is left more and more too cheap imported labor. Then as they extol this wonderful produce they loudly lament the growing numbers of non-nationals living in their midst and demand exclusionary policies that will prevent these “undesirable foreigners” (Albanians in Italy, Turks in Germany, Moroccans in Spain, and Algerian and other Middle Easterners in France for example) from overwhelming their countries – sound familiar.

 

I also find it amusing how many people claim that if we all shopped at the Whole Foods and Mother’s type markets we would be so much healthier. Nonsense one can eat just as healthy shopping at the standard old supermarkets – Albertsons, Costco, Kroger, Safeway, or Walmart. It is NOT a matter of where one buys ones food but rather WHAT one buys. The major problem is that as a whole Americans have become LAZY – they simply don’t want to spend the time cooking. It is so much easier to stop on the way home from work and buy fast food or stop at a Fairway type marked and buy pre-prepared food to zap it in the microwave. Study after study has shown that people who eat at home and cook their own food from “scratch” are healthier and leaners than those who don’t.

 

As far as obesity is concerned it is time and more that we stop making excuses and start facing some harsh, mean and cruel facts.

I mean this, what would you recommend for European obesity issue? Just say no???
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Wisconsinguy I believe your comment to be dismissive and condescending, however, if your question is legitimate I apologize and here is my answer. Yes we and they are both going to have to learn to just say no. I have both a nephew and a dear friend who are obscenely obese. They have both been waiting for years for science to develop a magic bill that would allow them to eat everything they wanted in any quantity they wanted and then the magic pill would dissolve all those unwanted calories. My nephew recently gave up on the pill hope and had some new type of stomach procedure performed– not a lap band or a traditional bypass. He was informed prior to the surgery that all of these procedures have major health risks and might shorten his life but he went with it anyway. Now he is seeing a psychologist because he is depressed because he can no longer comfortably eats the quantities he still wants.

 

Europeans have, over the last few years become more and more dependent on fast foods and pre-prepared foods just like us. Thus they are going to have to do is the same thing we will eventually have to do. That is return to preparing meals and eating at home. We will ALWAYS be obese as long as we continue to depend on fast food and pre-prepared foods. There are NO quick and easy answers. Both Americans and Europeans are eventually going to have to come to grips with the horrific cost of the physical conditions that accompany obesity diabetes, heart failure, stroke, and joint deterioration to name just a few. In Europe certain types of health care is rationed and I sincerely fear that someday we will see implemented a system to eliminates health insurance for people whose weight exceeds a certain amount in relationship to their height. I am certainly not recommended this but I’m afraid it is something the future might hold.

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I won't say it's impossible to know exactly what's in our food supply, and how it metabolizes in our bodies, but it's definitely not easy. There are currently around 5,000 additives that go into our nation's food supply, up from zero a few generations ago.

 

Having spent a decade in the processed food industry and following it for additional decades, I can tell you that very rarely is an additive there to make the food more nutritious. It's there to make the food taste better and make consumers want more of it; to make the food last longer on the shelf; to make it easier to manufacture; to make it look more appealing; and, most important, to make it cheaper and therefore more profitable to the manufacturer.

 

Try picking up a package in the grocery store and reading the ingredient list, and then tell me how many of these additives your mother had in her kitchen cupboard when you were growing up.

 

The situation is no better in fast food joints, and probably much worse, since we don't even have the opportunity to see a list of what's in the food. Most restaurants use manufactured foods at some point in preparing what goes on the table and we won't have a clue what we're putting into our bodies.

 

I'm not saying it's impossible to get a handle on what we eat, I'm just saying that it will take much more time and effort - and money - than most folks are prepared to spend.

 

There was a really good segment on 60 Minutes a few years ago about the flavor industry and the incredible effort they put into finding the right blend of chemicals to make food taste the way the manufacturer wants it to. One of the primary qualities they were going for was one that made the consumer want to eat more of the product. They didn't want a flavor that produced satiety; they wanted a flavor that teased the consumer into eating just one more. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-eatdrink020.gif

 

While it's easy to natter on about individual responsibility and how easy it is to 'just say no', it's naive to think that the processed food industry isn't spending billions of dollars a year to get us to say 'yes'. Believe me, if it wasn't working, they wouldn't be doing it.

 

And if you don't believe me, check out this article that tells you just how they do it. And why.

 

Spoiler alert: Don't bother looking for the part where these folks have a good talk about making their food more nutritious, because they don't.

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Wisconsinguy I believe your comment to be dismissive and condescending, however, if your question is legitimate I apologize and here is my answer. Yes we and they are both going to have to learn to just say no. I have both a nephew and a dear friend who are obscenely obese. They have both been waiting for years for science to develop a magic bill that would allow them to eat everything they wanted in any quantity they wanted and then the magic pill would dissolve all those unwanted calories. My nephew recently gave up on the pill hope and had some new type of stomach procedure performed– not a lap band or a traditional bypass. He was informed prior to the surgery that all of these procedures have major health risks and might shorten his life but he went with it anyway. Now he is seeing a psychologist because he is depressed because he can no longer comfortably eats the quantities he still wants.

 

Europeans have, over the last few years become more and more dependent on fast foods and pre-prepared foods just like us. Thus they are going to have to do is the same thing we will eventually have to do. That is return to preparing meals and eating at home. We will ALWAYS be obese as long as we continue to depend on fast food and pre-prepared foods. There are NO quick and easy answers. Both Americans and Europeans are eventually going to have to come to grips with the horrific cost of the physical conditions that accompany obesity diabetes, heart failure, stroke, and joint deterioration to name just a few. In Europe certain types of health care is rationed and I sincerely fear that someday we will see implemented a system to eliminates health insurance for people whose weight exceeds a certain amount in relationship to their height. I am certainly not recommended this but I’m afraid it is something the future might hold.

Apology accepted. Never have been, nor ever will be that kind of person. I think you may have missed a post of mine before the one you commented on? Would like you thoughts when you have time.
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Wisconsinguy I certainly agree with the quote you use from your elderly gentleman acquaintance - "I don't care what method YOU use as long as YOU can get clean". The key word in this quote, for me at least, is "YOU". I can't do it for "you", your priest/minister/rabbi can't do it for "you", your doctor can't do it for "you" and the government can't do it for "you". Only "you" can do it for "yourself". A doctor can cut out a patient’s cancer and put him/her on chemotherapy; he or she can’t do those things for himself or herself. A doctor can diagnosis diabetes and put a diabetic on insulin and help him/her keep track of his/her sugar level, he or she can’t do those things for himself or herself. A doctor can diagnosis cystic fibrosis and help a patient’s comfort level even though he cannot cure it, and again he or she can’t do those things for himself or herself. A doctor cannot cure an individual’s alcoholism only the individual can do that. A doctor cannot cure an individual’s drug addiction, only the individual can do that. A doctor cannot “cure” an individual’s obesity only the person can do that. I am, of course, totally aware that what I’m about to say is currently out of fashion and currently politically/socially incorrect BUT I will NEVER believe that alcoholism, drug addiction, and obesity are illnesses. They are rather poor life style choices that people make for themselves.

 

As an aside my father was an alcoholic and my mother a valium addict. Dad remained an alcoholic his entire adult life. However, my mother broke her addiction to valium by herself without the assistance of anybody or anything other than her own will power.

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From the article section on Olive Garden: Garden’s investors – the fund Starboard Value – is now trying to change the situation, believing serving good food is a better strategy than simply serving lots of food. “Extreme portion size is inconsistent with authentic Italian values,” Starboard says.

 

I find that to be so true when I travel to Europe. I'm there for around a month at a time and eat out for most of my meals. My experience is that in Europe I eat better (because of the emphasis on fresh ingredients) without ever being stuffed to the hilt (because the portion sizes aren't enough for three people). Between the portion sizes and the walking, I usually end up losing three pounds by the time I return to the States.

 

 

What's keeping you from living that way in the US? We have sidewalks, fresh vegetables and restaurants that don't serve you enough to feed three people.

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Wisconsinguy I certainly agree with the quote you use from your elderly gentleman acquaintance - "I don't care what method YOU use as long as YOU can get clean". The key word in this quote, for me at least, is "YOU". I can't do it for "you", your priest/minister/rabbi can't do it for "you", your doctor can't do it for "you" and the government can't do it for "you". Only "you" can do it for "yourself". A doctor can cut out a patient’s cancer and put him/her on chemotherapy; he or she can’t do those things for himself or herself. A doctor can diagnosis diabetes and put a diabetic on insulin and help him/her keep track of his/her sugar level, he or she can’t do those things for himself or herself. A doctor can diagnosis cystic fibrosis and help a patient’s comfort level even though he cannot cure it, and again he or she can’t do those things for himself or herself. A doctor cannot cure an individual’s alcoholism only the individual can do that. A doctor cannot cure an individual’s drug addiction, only the individual can do that. A doctor cannot “cure” an individual’s obesity only the person can do that. I am, of course, totally aware that what I’m about to say is currently out of fashion and currently politically/socially incorrect BUT I will NEVER believe that alcoholism, drug addiction, and obesity are illnesses. They are rather poor life style choices that people make for themselves.

 

As an aside my father was an alcoholic and my mother a valium addict. Dad remained an alcoholic his entire adult life. However, my mother broke her addiction to valium by herself without the assistance of anybody or anything other than her own will power.

My point to other chronic illness is this. Although a doc (and nurse practitioners) can prescribe treatments, they do just that for the addictions. They help by offering different ideas and modes of treatment. AND, I have worked with truly countless patients that have experienced the ravages of their chronic illness. AND, countless patients that have been non-compliant with their doctors or health care providers care. Yep, a doctor can order the insulin. That is just the easy part, and just the beginning.
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What's keeping you from living that way in the US? We have sidewalks, fresh vegetables and restaurants that don't serve you enough to feed three people.

 

Not many. I eat out often and usually order an appetizer and a side. I usually eat about half of each before I'm full. The restaurants often ask whether there was a problem with the food.

 

As for sidewalks, walking and taking public transport is far more practical in big cities.

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...As for sidewalks, walking and taking public transport is far more practical in big cities.

 

Sadly, this is true only in some big cities. In New York, Chicago, and San Francisco one can easily get around without a car. It is do-able in LA, but not particularly practical unless one's home and job are in close proximity. Other large cities are too spread out to make public transit practical. Here in San Diego, we drive to the walking path.

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Good question, Rudy. I do what I can, the most important thing of which is doing my own cooking. A lot depends on where you live. I live in the suburbs. I do walk, but a tour of my neck of the woods gets old very quickly. Most of my walk time is on a machine in the gym. As for fresh veggies, the nearest grocery store to my house is a little over a mile and a half away. When I come back to the States, I always miss being able to walk to the markets. (Don't get me started on the veggies, though. For the most part, I cook for one. The chains near me sell carrots by the bag when I only need a couple.)

 

Epigonos, I'm sure statistics back you up on obesity in Europe. Based on the number and popularity of chains like Burger King and KFC, I'd say the Americanization of the European diet is well underway. However, my eyes tell me that it's no where near the epidemic that it is in the states, at least not yet.

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I won't say it's impossible to know exactly what's in our food supply, and how it metabolizes in our bodies, but it's definitely not easy. There are currently around 5,000 additives that go into our nation's food supply, up from zero a few generations ago.

 

Having spent a decade in the processed food industry and following it for additional decades, I can tell you that very rarely is an additive there to make the food more nutritious. It's there to make the food taste better and make consumers want more of it; to make the food last longer on the shelf; to make it easier to manufacture; to make it look more appealing; and, most important, to make it cheaper and therefore more profitable to the manufacturer.

 

Try picking up a package in the grocery store and reading the ingredient list, and then tell me how many of these additives your mother had in her kitchen cupboard when you were growing up.

 

The situation is no better in fast food joints, and probably much worse, since we don't even have the opportunity to see a list of what's in the food. Most restaurants use manufactured foods at some point in preparing what goes on the table and we won't have a clue what we're putting into our bodies.

 

I'm not saying it's impossible to get a handle on what we eat, I'm just saying that it will take much more time and effort - and money - than most folks are prepared to spend.

 

There was a really good segment on 60 Minutes a few years ago about the flavor industry and the incredible effort they put into finding the right blend of chemicals to make food taste the way the manufacturer wants it to. One of the primary qualities they were going for was one that made the consumer want to eat more of the product. They didn't want a flavor that produced satiety; they wanted a flavor that teased the consumer into eating just one more. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-eatdrink020.gif

 

While it's easy to natter on about individual responsibility and how easy it is to 'just say no', it's naive to think that the processed food industry isn't spending billions of dollars a year to get us to say 'yes'. Believe me, if it wasn't working, they wouldn't be doing it.

 

And if you don't believe me, check out this article that tells you just how they do it. And why.

 

Spoiler alert: Don't bother looking for the part where these folks have a good talk about making their food more nutritious, because they don't.

Just finished the article. I always like to be enlightened, and learn something in a day. On my scale, I give this one an 8 out of 10 for excellence. Will do some digging, and read more from the author. Has a great style to inform/teach!
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I read "Born Round" a few years ago, the autobiography of a gay restaurant reviewer from the New York Times, where he talked about his weight issues. One thing that did it for him was that when he was presented with some marvelous dish, he could restrain himself, because he knew (in his job) he was likely to get served something equally marvelous the next day. Not very practical advice for the rest of us.

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