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Where would you live?


twinkboylover28
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I would flit back and forth between my house in Palm Springs, my apartment in Manhattan, my apartment in San Francisco, my flat in London, my cabin in the Rockies, and my beach house on Fire Island. I wouldn't bother with a home in Paris, since I could always stay at the Ritz.

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I've never been but Sydney seems to be the kind of place I would like to call home. Beachfront of course. For a Mountain get-away chalet, I think the Italian Alps.

 

Of course, if money were no object, I would travel extensively on my private jet, so those homes would be luxurious closets.

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My favorite cities are Paris, Barcelona, and Berlin. I'd have places in all three.

 

But here's a little secret not known much outside of Minnesota: The lakes in the northern part of that state are so pure and pristine that you can safely drink the water as you canoe through it. The thousands of square miles of forest around them and the thousands of lakes constitute what are called the "boundary waters"--among the most beautiful places in the world. I'd have a cabin there--for May and June (until the mosquitoes arrive) and then for September and October (after they leave).

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Guest zipperzone

With unlimited income, the temptation to have multiple dwellings is very strong indeed.

 

However, I think a problem would arise if you owned homes in several locations, let's say four for example - i.e. London, New York, San Francisco and Sydney (all places I would love to live in)

 

The trouble for me would be that it would be difficult to establish any meaningful social circles. Friends take time to find and cultivate and you would just be getting to be established with one group when you were ready to jet off to another of your homes, only to start all over again. And presumably as you would only be visiting each of these homes at infrequent intervals, it would be difficult to drop back in and start up again with the friends you have but with whom you have not been able to keep up, so to speak. I'm not sure if I'm explaining myself very clearly, but hopefully you'll get my drift.

 

So for me, the ideal would be a small house in a quaint little village somewhere in England. It could be in the Cotswolds, or the lake district, or the south coast.... a thatched cottage would be nice. The village would be small enough so that it would be easy to get to know many people. It would have a nice cozy pub or "local"

and a truly village atmosphere. AND it would be no more than 2 hours to London, where I would have a pied-a-terre.

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While I understand the need to feel connected to a group, with unlimited wealth, one could certainly have people travel to you and with you. There is always the "do they like me for me or do they like me for what I can give them" question which of course is always answered, they like you for what you can give them. Unlimited wealth does have its drawbacks

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Guest zipperzone

>While I understand the need to feel connected to a group,

>with unlimited wealth, one could certainly have people travel

>to you and with you. There is always the "do they like

>me for me or do they like me for what I can give them"

>question which of course is always answered, they like you for

>what you can give them. Unlimited wealth does have its

>drawbacks

 

The logistics of becoming an ad hoc travel agent would be beyond me.

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Oh, I think I would like a small ranchero somewhere high in the Sierras above Cuicatlan, Oaxaca. An elegant but small hacienda, with large tracts of undisturbed woodland surrounding it... maybe I'd run it as a gay B&B eco-resort sort of place. Hiking, horseback riding, birdwatching and botanizing... .

 

And of course I would maintain a flat in San Francisco, for when I need distraction.

 

La Trix :-)

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I would live right where I do now but I would travel at the merest whim. Treveling is relatively easy when you have the money to do it properly. It is easy for me to organize most any trip as I have been traveling professionally for 40 years. All I need is the necessary amount of money and someone to do the grunt work, as required.

 

As in many things in life, renting is much cheaper than owning. A cynic might say that is true with relationships also but no one owns another these days, at least not in the US. Back on point, renting a chalet in Switzerland or a cabin in Montana or a large house on any of several islands in the Caribbean for a day, week, month or longer is not a problem. If you don't like the place, the people, the attitude, just move on. If you really, really love some place for whatever reason, then consider some long term situation but that might or might not include ownership.

 

Travel in broading. Just look at my rear end and you will agree. It also provides a perspective not easily found otherwise. You all know this. But, traveling is fun, educational and produces opportunity to meet others. Yes, others of whatever stripe, including whatever stripe you might be or have. :)

 

Freedom is what it is all about. You already have that so what you need now is a little more money or better planning. Those things are up to you. :)

 

In other words, you can fulfill your dreams in this category if you set your sights properly or plan properly or perform properly. Just a small push to give you a proper incentive. :)

 

Best regards,

KMEM

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You make a good point, but I travel mainly to see new places or to visit familiar places where I want to see someone or something briefly. All the places I mentioned were places where I have lived, or where I have spent enough time to know that I would enjoy settling down for long periods of time. When I go back to New York or London, for instance, I want to feel like a resident again and not just a visitor.

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Charlie,

I understand what you are saying and don't disagree. However, that was not to be in my career. I have been very lucky in finding someone who was willing to show me the local sights wherever I went, whether it be Picadilly Circus or the Matterhorn or the Harbor Bridge in Sydney or the South Island in NZ. I have friends all over the world and certainly here in the US. So, if I set up shop (rented a room, house or whatever) in their town, I am sure we could have a long as I wanted, very nice visit and do whatever seemed appropriate.

 

Meeting people like this is usually a matter of extending your self towards them and being willing to understand their point of view. In other words, just being a reasonable human being.

 

For many years I almost felt like a stranger in my own home town because I would be there many times only to wash clothes, check my mail, pay my bills and depart again. Perhaps surprisingly, one gets used to that after a while and, at one point, I would get edgy if I weren't traveling or about to travel. Sounds a bit like some of our escort friends, doesn't it? :)

 

Best regards,

KMEM

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