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Long ago & far away


kjun
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Did any of you have an "ice box" in your home when you were a kid. We did and I sometime think of this when I open a refrigerator. Being from the South, I do not understand how we survived without air conditioning. But, you can't miss what does not exist, and we sure didn't have an A/C when I was a young boy.

 

the Cajun

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>Did any of you have an "ice box" in your home when you were a

>kid. We did and I sometime think of this when I open a

>refrigerator. Being from the South, I do not understand how

>we survived without air conditioning. But, you can't miss what

>does not exist, and we sure didn't have an A/C when I was a

>young boy.

>

>the Cajun

 

I have a standing joke with some friends about the things we cannot survive without now that were quite easy to do without back when.

 

AC is certainly on the list, though the local drug store and movie theater were both aircooled and I admit to sneaking into both for a brief respite from the summer heat.

Cell phones, microwaves, personal computers, i-pods are all on the list.

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People will probably hate me for saying this but I wish we still didn't have AC. Without AC it takes only 4 to 7 days to acclimate. But in todays Air conditioned world most people NEVER acclimate to summer temperatures. If we only used the AC on the extreme days then we would be comfortable being outside most of the summer.

 

When I see that it's 90 and humid I dress accordingly. But while shorts and a tank top are comfortable when it's hot they are not enough when it is 68 degrees. So I have to carry a sweater and a hat if I go to Florida in the summer. Because they actually turn the AC to 65 in a lot of places, brrr. I know a lot of you are thinking that 65 sounds nice. Well if thats true then why is your winter thermostat set in the 70s ?

 

I went to a convention in Orlando and stayed in a hotel accross the street. Most of the attendees stripped to a T-shirt to walk outside to the convention center but almost everyone carried a jacket, long sleeve shirt or sweater to put on once they got inside. But there is plenty of oil right?

 

Raul

Who gets happy, horny and hard when its hot.

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Guest zipperzone

If you were asked to choose the ONE most important invention to you, in the past 100 years, what would it be?

 

For me it would be a toss up between the automobile and the personal computer and internet. Google still blows my mind.

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RE: Long ago & far away

 

You don't need to toss that coin. The automobile wasn't invented in the last 100 years. Da Vinci sketched plans for one in the 15th century. Even if you peg that to Henry Ford, he founded Ford Motor Company in 1903. And that's certainly not the invention of the automobile.

 

I suspect the answer would be rather fluid for everyone. There was a time in my life when one-hour dry cleaning was a miracle of modern science! ;-)

 

I remember how those newfangled telefax machines changed how we did business, and when that newfangled FedEx service became available between some cities.

 

I also remember having staff members going to sick bay when the newfangled machines from Xerox caused major burns to the private parts they were copying.

 

But everything I've seen pales in comparison to my great grandmother, who survived the great prairie fire of 18-something-or-other in a sod house, was rescued by Colonel Bill Hickock, and lived to see baseball invented, and then radio so she could follow her favorite team, and then TV, and eventually she saw man walk on the moon.

 

The mind boggles when you think of these things.

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Guest skrubber

RE: Long ago & far away

 

I was just in Louisiana - Bossier City to be exact - and it was brutally HOT. I was always thinking how did these people survive before A/C? I spent no more than ten minutes outside at a time.

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RE: Long ago & far away

 

A bit more than 100 years, but the development of electrical lighting led to the electrical power system, and all the conveniences which make our lives what they are, including air conditioning, TV, computer. So in my opinion, it was clearly the most important in the last 120 years or so.

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Guest resorts777

>Did any of you have an "ice box" in your home when you were a

>kid. We did and I sometime think of this when I open a

>refrigerator. Being from the South, I do not understand how

>we survived without air conditioning. But, you can't miss what

>does not exist, and we sure didn't have an A/C when I was a

>young boy.

>

>the Cajun

 

 

Also being from the "ice box" era I can tell you we survived without A/C by enduring many sleepless nights drowning in our sweat and being sent home early from work because the office was dangerously hot. Oh how I long for those "good old days."

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Guest ReturnOfS

RE: Long ago & far away

 

>

>I suspect the answer would be rather fluid for everyone. There

>was a time in my life when one-hour dry cleaning was a miracle

>of modern science! ;-)

>

 

I wish that I knew of a place where I can get drycleaning done in an hour.

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We didn't have airconditioning my first 10 years of life. We had an attic fan which pulled in (hot) air through any open window. If the temperature did not go below 80 at night we would sit up in a window until 2-3 AM. The South would be inhospitable without A/C.

 

My favorite for the best invention is the thermos bottle. It will keep hot liquids hot and cold liquids cold. How does it know?:-)

 

Best regards,

KMEM

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When I was a kid, I enjoyed staying with my grandmother in the summer, because she didn't have electricity, so of course she had an icebox and no air conditioning, not even a fan. She didn't have indoor plumbing either, just a hand pump in the kitchen sink, which meant going to the outhouse at night, with a flashlight, could be pretty unpleasant.

 

I still remember the excitement when we got our first 12" black and white tv, and had a choice of three channels to watch. Now I am typing this on a computer while simultaneously watching a live tennis match from New York on one of the thousand cable channels on my color tv.

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Guest RandyRon

sure remember the Ice Box. Then when we got a refrigerator everyone called them Frigidaires because that was one of the first brands. When I was a kid, the very wealthy had sleeping porches as part of the bed room. It was just a porch (usually on the second floor) that was screened on three sides. I also remember that my grandparents had a screened in dining room for summer use. Does anyone else remember that Funeral Homes gave away hand fans to all the churches as advertising?

 

Most definitely appreciate indoor plumbing. Trying to crap in an outhouse when it's below freezing means you don't linger and read the newspaper.

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I dont feel so old any more..ice boxes were before my time, but I do remember the old refrigerator/freezers that you had to defrost...chiseling away at the ice...or how about the early microwaves..called amana radarranges? Or..when you had to get up and walk to the tv to change the channel??? or. a little more modern history.. what about Pong, the first readily available home video game..

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>She

>didn't have indoor plumbing either, just a hand pump in the

>kitchen sink, which meant going to the outhouse at night, with

>a flashlight, could be pretty unpleasant.

 

I remember some relatives who did not get indoor plumbing until 1964. The wife loved it but her husband continued using the outhouse to the end of his life. He never got over the notion that taking a dump was too nasty a thing to do in the house.

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>People will probably hate me for saying this but I wish we

>still didn't have AC. Without AC it takes only 4 to 7 days to

>acclimate. But in todays Air conditioned world most people

>NEVER acclimate to summer temperatures. If we only used the AC

>on the extreme days then we would be comfortable being outside

>most of the summer.

 

Spoken like someone from Chicago! :D I recently spent a few hot/humid August days in New Orleans. Remember, the typical A/C dehumidifies to cool. I couldn't imagine surviving a whole summer in New Orleans w/o one!

 

I grew up in the deep south. I believe I was 6 before we had A/C. First few years we only used it at night - of course I grew up spending all my time outside during the day.

 

We still have people w/o A/C that die each year in heat waves. Since they do not have A/C you would think they would be acclimated. Usually these are older people and as people age, the ability to acclimate quickly declines.

 

But I am willing to see you all hot and sweaty any day! :+

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One thing to remember is that those by-gone days were before the creeping climate change. The average temperature of the world is higher now than it was before the invention and widespread adoption of air condition. Perhaps just marginally so but the trend is in that direction and without the active cooperation of the industrialized world in cutting emissions, the average temp will continue to rise for the foreseeable future.

 

So while acclimating to hot weather without A/C remains possible for some people, some of the time, in some parts of the world, it seems reasonable to assert that the absence of A/C would make some parts of the world virtually uninhabitable for significant periods of time.

 

And I remember attending a concert in May in Carnegie Hall a year or two before they finally air conditioned the place. It was an Easter Sunday performance of Bach's St. Matthew Passion by the American Symphony Orchestra. The heat and humidity in the hall was so oppressive that people were falling asleep all over the place -- no, it was not just the Bach -- and I, who almost never leave a concert, left at intermission because I couldn't take the oppressive climate in the hall any more. The odd thing is now they have good air conditioning in Carnegie but they still adhere to the "traditional" concert season and don't have concerts off-season, a relic of the days before air-conditioning that makes little sense, since summer is a big tourist season and properly programmed Carnegie Hall could be a big tourist draw.

 

One thing A/C has made possible is indoor concerts in the summer, which I have enjoyed in Lincoln Center and overseas in places like Vienna and Amsterdam. It used to be that during the summer there were no serious concerts except perhaps for outdoor performance places like the Hollywood Bowl or Lewisohn Stadium in NY.

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