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What If I Win?


deej
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If I win, I could share the prize, couldn't I? Actually, I am a firm believer of having these things settled before you die so the family isn't stuck at the last minute dealing with some funeral director that wants to bleed them dry. Thousands of dollars for a box for my bones? Not for me. Burn me and bury me...or scatter my ashes in the hills above Hooville!

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Thousands of dollars for a box for my bones? Not for me. Burn me and bury me...or scatter my ashes in the hills above Hooville!

 

Likewise. And what a waste of land! Scatter me in a rose garden and hope I don't kill the roses. That's what my wife wanted, so that's what she got - not on the roses, though - she wanted to be swept up in the Hoover (was that prophetic?). I've also taken her on my travels - she's in the Atlantic, the Pacific, Windsor Castle, Chatsworth, Blenheim Palace, The Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Belize - if I've been there, so has she.

 

I'd say enter - will you know if you win?

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Guest zipperzone

> I've also taken her on my travels - she's in the Atlantic,

>the Pacific, Windsor Castle, Chatsworth, Blenheim Palace, The

>Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Belize - if I've been there, so

>has she.

 

That's truly bizarre - what do you do, leave a thinblefull in the ashtrays of every stately home you visit?

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My fourth husband wanted to be creamated and spread. So, when he died, I creamated him. But then, emotionally, I needed him in a place where I could occaisionally visit him. So, I didn't spread him. A few years later, when I was ready, the idea of spreading him felt like throwing him out of the house. However, Maverick doesn't want him in the living room with the ashes of our last three pets. So, the poor man went back in the closet. Bad pun, but its true.

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I do wonder if zipperzone has ever been in love. People who are in a loving relationship, whether straight or gay, often fantasize about the places that they would like to travel together. Then things happen, children are born, job promotions are received, money gets tight, and for whatever reasons they can't take these trips.

 

So I find it very romantic that if one of the partner dies and the remaining partner finally gets to take these trips, he remembers his deceased partner along the way. Ashes being symbolic, to take and disperse them in each of the cities which the deceased wanted to visit may not make sense to zipperzone, but it does to others who have lost someone they cared about. It's a gesture, a reminder of the love they shared and the goals they dreamed of.

 

I always wanted to take my partner to Venice, where I reallly enjoyed a visit once. I told him that if we never went that he was to take my picture with him, set it on the table at a nice restaurant in St. Marks Square where the band is playing, and have a drink on me. Silly? Maybe. But not bizarre.

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>if I've been there, so has she.

 

That's cool.

 

Hooboy always said he wanted his ashes spread at Neimann Marcus. :+

 

A friend and his brother recently lost their father. The old man wanted his ashes spread on the golf course adjoining his retirement community, which was strictly forbidden.

 

They snuck out at midnight, found a pleasant spot, and up-ended the box expecting the ashes to gracefully flow away in the breeze. Instead, the lot hit the ground in a loud WHUMP! There stood two 50-something businessmen, reduced to teenagers mid-prank, stomping and kicking to disperse the ashes. LOL

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Guest zipperzone

>I do wonder if zipperzone has ever been in love.

 

As a matter of fact - I have and indeed I am.

 

>Ashes being

>symbolic, to take and disperse them in each of the cities

>which the deceased wanted to visit may not make sense to

>zipperzone, but it does to others who have lost someone they

>cared about. It's a gesture, a reminder of the love they

>shared and the goals they dreamed of.

 

You may find it symbolic - sorry, but I just find it morbid.

 

>I always wanted to take my partner to Venice, where I reallly

>enjoyed a visit once. I told him that if we never went that he

>was to take my picture with him, set it on the table at a nice

>restaurant in St. Marks Square where the band is playing, and

>have a drink on me. Silly? Maybe. But not bizarre.

 

No - neither silly nor bizarre. Quite sweet actually. But I'd bet you wouldn't want him to get ashes in his martini, now would you?

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Lucky Dog!

 

From the WSJ:

 

Hopes for 'Lucky'

 

For smaller companies, courting consumers with low-price, high-tech toys is a key part of competing with industry titans like Mattel Inc. and Hasbro Inc. This fall, Bannockburn, Ill.-based Zizzle LLC, will release a mechanical plush dog named Lucky that responds to 16 verbal commands using a microprocessor similar to voice-activation technology used in cellphones. After saying the dog's name, kids can tell Lucky to do things such as lie down, sit or shake.

 

Zizzle tried to sell the dog in 2005, but cut back production after it became clear that the retail price would near $50. (Zizzle usually markets toys between $10 and $35.) This year, lower costs on the voice chip, alongside other savings related to the toy's development, meant Lucky could sell for $30.

 

"There's been a pretty big change in the weather," says Marc Rosenberg, Zizzle's chief marketing officer. In order to be competitive, "you have to make chips do more for less money."

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