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Dead Dog on Highway Shoulder


twinkboylover28
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I was driving back home to the metro-Detroit area from my weekly meeting with one of my "hot skinny white twink boys" in Flint just a couple of hours ago when I noticed what I originally thought was a dead deer on the highway shoulder.

 

It wasn't until I passed the carcas that I realized it was a beautiful German Sheppard which was obviously bleeding massively around its head from blunt force trauma. It's tongue was also draped out. The dog was obviously dead.

 

I was absolutely sick to my stomach to see this. Am I too sensitive? I assume most people don't even give a f&*$?

 

How in the world does this happen in today's day and age? My dog would never end up killed on the freeway.

 

There is no excuse for someone to neglect their dog like this. Either someone deliberately threw their dog out of their car window, or (less likely) the dog somehow got lost from its owner and ran onto the freeway before being struck by a car.

 

Now I realize animals are less of a priority when compared to (most)humans, but such blatant disregard for the care of a pet is just unacceptable.

 

In Michigan, most of us have had the unfortunate experience of dodging deer on the freeway, but under no circumstances should pets (wanted or unwanted) be killed on our US Highways.

 

Being naturaly pro-life and an animal-lover myself, it just disgust me to see animals suffer. When I watch Animal Planets "Animal Rescue" program it just makes me even more sick to see some pet owners (ie- scum bags) leave their dogs out in below-freezing temps so their pets actually freeze to death! What a horrid way to die.

 

What has society come to? Some owners allow their own pets! to needlessly suffer? If they treat their own pets like this imagine how they treat their own children? (One twink recently told me his mom bought him crack for his birthday so they could smoke it together.) It's just sad.

 

Anyways, I just needed to vent. Here's more nasty news clippings from years back. There's no shortage of them:

 

http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?id=28788

 

http://forums.winamp.com/showthread.php?s=662eb9988e4c9ff36624170c86165681&postid=1748024

 

http://noworldsystem.com/2008/03/04/video-us-marine-throws-puppy-off-cliff

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I have not been able to find the exact Ghandi quote, there seem to be many variations so I will paraphrase Ghandi: The moral character of a nation may be judged by how it treats its animals.

I would say the US has quite a bit or work to do before it could be positively judged by this standard.

 

I have never seen a purplekow;

I never hope to see one;

I can tell you anyhow;

I'd rather see than be one

 

Help there is a purplekow in my mirror

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I am a lifelong animal lover and can't even watch animals being killed on TV any more, although I hunted (and ate every thing I killed) when I was younger but no longer, unless it was that or starve.

 

Some in the US do deplorable things to animals, childred and each other but not everyone. Actually, I think overall the US is more animal friendly than most anywhere else. We certainly spend more money on our pets than any where else. So far as I know, we don't eat dogs as a delicacy or monkey brains, etc.

 

There is always room for improvement.

 

Best regards,

KMEM

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>I am a lifelong animal lover and can't even watch animals

>being killed on TV any more

 

 

I agree, and even though it's part of the "food chain" I still can't watch the Discovery Channel when they show the Tiger killing other animals, etc.

 

The dog neglect on the highway is another story. It simply didn't have to happen.

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My housemate had been noticing an abandoned dog hiding under a car during days of heavy rains and finally decided to bring her home with him. After hundreds of dollars of vet bills, she has been a part of the household for almost a year. I would not know what to do without her.

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Guest Wetnwildbear

So nice that your roommate would stop to help an abandoned dog

 

hiding from the rain, which you then spent hundreds upon at the vet.

 

 

I wonder how many people who would stop for a dog, would walk

 

right by a man who was sick, dying, or just hiding from the rain

 

because they were homeless.

 

 

How many hundreds of dollars would any of us spend to save the life

 

of another human (stranger/homeless) in need?

 

Or is our compassion limited to creatures we consider cuddly and

 

over whom we can reign supreme?

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Guest josephga

A friend of mine found a dog a few weeks ago. she decided she wanted too keep it and took it too the vet. they said the dog has a chip in her and is over 200 miles from home. the tried a number of times too contact the owner with no results. since then she has paid the vet bills and they changed the chip info over too her name

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People are always more important than animals but animals don't choose their lifestyle. Some people don't either but it is not always easy to tell just by looking. Just because one does not stop to rescue every homeless person, vagrant and bum does not mean one does not care. Many charitibile organizations state that we, the public, should not hand out money or any thing else to individuals. It hinders their efforts to actually rescue people as opposed to putting a bandaid on their immediate need. Does that mean I totally ignore those I see. Certainly not, but I try to give gasoline, food or whatever might be oviously appropriate to those whe are having difficulties rather than cash, although cash has left my hands for theirs before also.

 

Not an easy problem to accurately get your mind around and certainly not an easy one to solve.

 

Best regards,

KMEM

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I adopted an abandoned dog last summer and we bonded almost immediately. He was about just over a year old and showed no signs of mistreatment. I think he just no longer fit into whichever family he belonged to so he became my buddy, at a time when I needed one. It was really serendipidy. I wouldn't part with him now for anything.

 

A few weeks ago we were travelling down to the city from my country home when I saw a small dog walking in the middle of the highway. I pulled over to the side and tried to get the dog to come to me but he was frightened. I frantically waved to passing cars and trucks so they wouldn't run over him. Finally I coaxed him over towards a house and in a few minutes a woman arrived in her car. She didn't know the dog so we assumed it had been dropped off on the highway without any ID.

 

She was able to hold the dog and I left it in her care. She said she would call the dog catcher in her rural community. I have no idea what fate awaited that dog. I felt badly I couldn't do more but at least I had saved him from a horrible fate in the middle of the highway. :-(

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>People are always more important than animals but animals

>don't choose their lifestyle. Some people don't either but it

>is not always easy to tell just by looking. Just because one

>does not stop to rescue every homeless person, vagrant and bum

>does not mean one does not care. Many charitibile

>organizations state that we, the public, should not hand out

>money or any thing else to individuals. It hinders their

>efforts to actually rescue people as opposed to putting a

>bandaid on their immediate need. Does that mean I totally

>ignore those I see. Certainly not, but I try to give

>gasoline, food or whatever might be oviously appropriate to

>those whe are having difficulties rather than cash, although

>cash has left my hands for theirs before also.

>

>Not an easy problem to accurately get your mind around and

>certainly not an easy one to solve.

>

>Best regards,

>KMEM

 

 

 

I agree. Well said. Plus it's better to help out an animal then to do what most people do and not help out either an animal or a human.

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>

>Being naturaly pro-life and an animal-lover myself, it just

>disgust me to see animals suffer. When I watch Animal Planets

>"Animal Rescue" program it just makes me even more

>sick to see some pet owners (ie- scum bags) leave their dogs

>out in below-freezing temps so their pets actually freeze to

>death! What a horrid way to die.

 

And some pet owners name their pets after politicos they consider vile and nit-witted?

 

>

>What has society come to? Some owners allow their own pets! to

>needlessly suffer? If they treat their own pets like this

>imagine how they treat their own children? (One twink recently

>told me his mom bought him crack for his birthday so they

>could smoke it together.) It's just sad.

 

Yes, it truly is sad corn-holing a crack addicted twink from Flint bareback...

>

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Guest zipperzone

>A friend of mine found a dog a few weeks ago. she decided she

>wanted too keep it and took it too the vet. they said the dog

>has a chip in her and is over 200 miles from home. the tried a

>number of times too contact the owner with no results. since

>then she has paid the vet bills and they changed the chip info

>over too her name

 

If the dog was that far from home, is it not possible that the owner was away from his home as well, possibly on vacation? This could explain the lack of response when trying to contact.

 

I once lost my dog for a period of three days and they were the most anxious days I ever spent. He had been freightened by a gunshot from an neighbor's idiot son (I was living in the country at the time) and he just bolted and ran without stopping.

 

I scoured the surrounding countryside for miles, putting reward posters in every mailbox and finally got a call from a farm about 5 miles away that had found him in an exhausted state. I am convinced it was the $300 offered that got them to call me. My dog was older and that could be seen by the white hair around his head and muzzle. The people that found him thought they could use the money to buy a younger dog so it made sense to them to return him. I truly don't believe "doing the right thing" had anything to do with it.

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Guest josephga

She got pissed at me lol i told her it wasnt the vets call on letting her keep the dog. i told her she could spend all that money and then have the dog taken away.. if the owners turned up..

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