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Who do I sue?


Rick Munroe
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>It should be WHOM do I sue?

 

Not necessarily. In formal writing, yes, but not in casual conversation or on a message board, where it can seem awkward or that the writer is trying too hard to impress with their knowledge of grammar. I actually sometimes mis-correct myself and change my good grammar to bad, because it sounds friendlier and less pretentious.

 

I just found this from Washington State University's website, and thought it was interesting:

 

Now consider this sort of question: “Who are you staring at?” Although strictly speaking the pronoun should be “whom,” nobody who wants to be taken seriously would use it in this case, though it is the object of the preposition “at.” (Bothered by ending the sentence with a preposition? See my “Non-Errors” page.) “Whom” is very rarely used even by careful speakers as the first word in a question, and many authorities have now conceded the point.

 

http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/who.html

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There is a definite resemblence in the body, not so much in the face.

As to whom should be cast in the role, the role should be cast with the person who best suits the part or perhaps to whom the role best fits.

 

 

 

I have never seen a purplekow;

I never hope to see one;

I can tell you anyhow;

I'd rather see than be one

 

Help there is a purplekow in my mirror

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>>It should be WHOM do I sue?

>

>Not necessarily. In formal writing, yes, but not in casual

>conversation or on a message board, where it can seem awkward

>or that the writer is trying too hard to impress with their

>knowledge of grammar. I actually sometimes mis-correct myself

>and change my good grammar to bad, because it sounds

>friendlier and less pretentious.

>

>I just found this from Washington State University's website,

>and thought it was interesting:

>

>Now consider this sort of question: “Who are you staring

>at?” Although strictly speaking the pronoun should be

>“whom,” nobody who wants to be taken seriously would use it in

>this case, though it is the object of the preposition

>“at.” (Bothered by ending the sentence with a preposition? See

>my “Non-Errors” page.) “Whom” is very rarely used even by

>careful speakers as the first word in a question, and many

>authorities have now conceded the point.

>

>http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/who.html

 

The latest AP Stylebook, the bible of most newspapers and magazines and hardly a high falutin' reference, says simply that "whom" is used as the object of a verb or of a pronoun.

 

But if you can find a source that says "whom" is formal, I suppose the word is on the way out. I don't find it use formal, just smooth, elegant, classy and correct.

 

Rick, weren't you recently complaining about sentences that end with prepositions?

 

 

>

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>

>

> I don't find it

>use formal,

 

And there you are, I neglected to use a possessive (its) before a noun (use). A typo, a proofreading error. And the baby pooped on my homework.

 

 

BTW: watch out for dumb editors who lean on spellcheck or grammar check. A friend published a story about the "Gallic" charms of Ireland and it came out the "Garlic" charms of Ireland. I guess Italian food is catching on in Dublin.

>

>>

>

 

 

"I'd say that's a bit of an extreme reaction, now wouldn't you?" -- N.F. Bates

 

 

Lankypeters

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>The latest AP Stylebook, the bible of most newspapers and

>magazines and hardly a high falutin' reference, says simply

>that "whom" is used as the object of a verb or of a

>pronoun.

 

You do realize that this is a message board, not an English class or a magazine or newspaper, right? Just checking. :p Please check my reply to you in the "Literacy" thread.

 

>Rick, weren't you recently complaining about sentences that

>end with prepositions?

 

No, that wasn't me, unless I was doing it in jest. I never seriously criticize others' grammar. That just seems obnoxious, don't you think?

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My first thought was Eddie Murphy, but after three times he is probably bored with that.

 

John Travolta, naw been there done that.

 

How about Helen Mirren, naw been there done that.

 

Sorry no good ones left.

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