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Hepatitis Vaccine Schedule?


WmClarke
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Can any of our medically trained or informed denizens please tel me what the vaccine schedule is for both the Hepatitis A vaccine and the Hepatitus B vaccine?

 

The clinic which started administering said vaccines to me last week was "out of handouts" and the doctor administering the shots was not sure. He told me to "google it" but my google-fu is weak today.

 

I need this information in plain English because most of the links I found were unintelligible gibberish--apparently I don't speak doctor-ese or government bureaucratish. And the Google Gremlins delighted in sending me to sites with information for medical professionals (which I certainly am not).

 

A phone call to the clinic today did not allay my fear that I still do not have the correct information.

 

TIA for any assistance.

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As a former dentist it was mandatory to be immunized against Hep B. I had Hep A as a child in 1960 and it was the worst experience of my life.

 

The protocol today is as follows and is similar to what I recall the Hep B protocol was and is more or less as noted in the previous posting.

 

The newer vaccine provides immunity against both the Hep A and B viruses. There is a series of 3 injections with an initial dose followed by doses at 1 month and 6 months. It can also be given in 4 doses, with the initial dose followed by doses at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1 month, and 1 year from the initial dose. I recall getting it via the three dose version. It certainly is a wise thing to consider. In adults it lasts 25 years and at least for the Hep B portion is 95% effective after the last dose takes effect which occurs at about 1 month after the last dose us given. I am considering seeing if I need to have my situation reevaluated. Unfortunately nothing is ever 100+ % effective.

 

I hope that his helps. Perhaps the MD's might have additional input.

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Got the shingles vaccine a few years ago. No side effects what so ever. However, like all vaccines it's not 100 percent foolproof, but better than not getting it. As time marches on its effectiveness decreases. In my case I have known too many individuals who have suffered from shingles including my dad who had such a severe case that he was hospitalized! Long story about that!

 

My advice get it sooner rather than later. It is recommended for age 60 and over. No definite recommendations for 50-59 from what I recall, but it might be a consideration. Incidentally I have seen shingles in the mouth. It is the nastiest thing that I have EVER seen! You definitely don't want to ever go there!

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Since i give these 2 vaccines day in, day out: Hep A is 2 doses: 1, then 6 months to a year later for #2.

Hep B is first dose, 2nd is 30 to 60 days later and 3rd dose is 4 months after the 2nd dose.

 

Shingles is a great vaccine - little to no side effects. It can/should be given even if you have had a episode. If you had chicken pox sometime in the past you are at risk for Shingles: the chicken pox virus lives in your nerve roots and is manifest as "shingles" at times of stress. Note: the rash of shingles does NOT cross the middle of the body but follows the distribution of the particular nerve root that it lives in. Very nasty! If you think you have not had chicken pox and you are safe, think again: the virus is ubiquitous (good word) and you may have had a subclinical or asymptomatic case, still a set up for shingles.

 

Ain't life grand!

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I had shingles about twenty-five years ago. Initially I had no idea what the problem was until my sister took a look and immediately identified it as shingles. Shingles is a herpes virus so the doctor put me on a medication used primarily for genital herpes (expensive, but my insurance paid). The medication worked like a charm on the pain but the rash and tingling took some time to go away.

I asked my current doctor if I should have the shot. I explained how my previous physician had treated the problem and the results. He informed me that he used the same medication and since I had experienced such good results I did NOT need to have the shot.

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...The clinic which started administering said vaccines to me last week was "out of handouts" and the doctor administering the shots was not sure. He told me to "google it" but my google-fu is weak today....

 

Why don't you ask your doctor? For that matter, why don't you get the shots at your doctor's office?

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One thing about the shingles vaccine. As far as I know all versions contain neomycin as a preservative. At least that was the case when I had it done. There was an issue that I might be allergic to neomycin. (Accordingly I always get the neomycin free flu shot.) At least that's what I was told many years ago. Hence I always avoided it. To make a long story short I was tested and it was determined that I was most likely not allergic. However, it was recommended that the vaccine be administered under the supervision of my MD just in case. At the time the only readily available source for the vaccine was a pharmacy in a local food market chain and it was common practice for the pharmacist to administer it. I definitely had my MD administer it. After all, I did not want to go into anaphylactic shock while strolling by the bananas on my way out the door! Better safe than sorry!

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Why don't you ask your doctor? For that matter, why don't you get the shots at your doctor's office?

I can't speak for the Hep vaccines, but many doctors don't get involved in administering certain vaccines. It usually is due to availability or possibly the size of the practice. In my posting above regarding the Shingles vaccine I personally had to pick up the vaccine at the pharmacy and then bring it to the doctor's office where he administered it. At the time it was the only readily available way to get it and there was only one pharmacy associated with a food market chain that carried it. Of course that was a different time and a different place. However, that was my experience.

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I had a very bad case of shingles-herpes about 10 years ago. It started as pimples in the area between my lip and my nose, and in a matter of very few days it "climbed" the left side of my face, getting dangerously close to my eye. The virus struck the trigeminal nerve and followed its path.

 

I spent a week in the hospital with Zovirax pumped into me non-stop via IV, and it cleared up. The doctor warned me that post herpetic effects (boy, am I getting technical) could include very severe pain. In fact, trigeminal-induced pain has often been called "suicide pain". Fortunately, it was never the case. I "only" had persistent itching, especially inside my nose (not a very comfortable spot to scratch in polite company), which eventually diminished, but has never totally disappeared. After ten years, the itching comes back, especially when I am stressed out or very tired. I take medicine when it happens. Other sequels include numbness in the area where it started. I wish I had got the vaccine back then!

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I had a very bad case of shingles-herpes about 10 years ago. It started as pimples in the area between my lip and my nose, and in a matter of very few days it "climbed" the left side of my face, getting dangerously close to my eye. The virus struck the trigeminal nerve and followed its path.

 

I spent a week in the hospital with Zovirax pumped into me non-stop via IV, and it cleared up. The doctor warned me that post herpetic effects (boy, am I getting technical) could include very severe pain. In fact, trigeminal-induced pain has often been called "suicide pain". Fortunately, it was never the case. I "only" had persistent itching, especially inside my nose (not a very comfortable spot to scratch in polite company), which eventually diminished, but has never totally disappeared. After ten years, the itching comes back, especially when I am stressed out or very tired. I take medicine when it happens. Other sequels include numbness in the area where it started. I wish I had got the vaccine back then!

Yes! The infamous Trigeminal Neuralgia (aka Tic Douloureux) of the infamous Fifth Cranial Nerve! At times referenced as Suicide Disease indeed! Fortunately for you it never got to that stage!

 

As I mentioned above my dad was similarly hospitalized. Then they developed the vaccine. I discussed it with my physician and since there was the possibility as noted above that I could be allergic to the neomycin in the preparation things were placed on hold. In the meantime a patient comes down with a case of Shingles in the oral cavity. It was the strangest thing I had ever seen because as [uSER=9945]@funguy[/uSER] mentions above is was only on his right side and did not cross the midline. Incidentally, the patient said that eating hot pizza triggered it. In fact he came to the office with that being his main complaint. Indeed that's what it possibly looked like. Until the next day that is when all hell broke loose! As I said it was one of the most vicious and bizarre things I have ever seen! In the meantime I could not get the freaking vaccine fast enough!

 

Incidentally, I recall responding to an emergency on a Sunday morning. A sweet little old grandma said that she had a tooth ache. It was so bad she said... and I quote, "Get the FUCKING TOOTH OUT!!!!!" I could find nothing wrong with any tooth, but she complained of pain. I suspected a possible neuralgia. The following day she pulled into the parking lot. However, she did not come to my office. She visited the MD in the complex, it was obviously a case of the shingles that was not evident the previous day. However, she subsequently developed the characteristic rash etc. Well, at least she never lost a tooth...

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Since i give these 2 vaccines day in, day out: Hep A is 2 doses: 1, then 6 months to a year later for #2.

Hep B is first dose, 2nd is 30 to 60 days later and 3rd dose is 4 months after the 2nd dose.

 

 

This is exactly the regime I got for the Fire Department when I first started.

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But had you been in the years before?

I was tested for hep b 6 months prior to diagnosis and was negative. I had no sexual contact after that time. How long does it take for antibodies/symptoms to show? At least I cleared the virus and cannot transmit the disease.

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Shingles??? Get the vaccine, get the vaccine, GET THE F*CKING VACCINE. I'm on month five of dealing with it (so now it's actually Post Herpetic Neuralgia). Started just after my 60th b'day and I had asked a couple of different physicians about getting the vaccine but didn't. I can't tell you how much this sucks. Tried, acupuncture, chiropractic, steroids, opiates, cold laser, marijuana infused coconut oil (applied directly and consumed), and enough other things that I can't even remember them all. The pain is pretty much gone now but I'm left with this itching that's awful. It's all in the normal place (across the chest just under the left pectoral) so at least other than an occasional itchy bump in other places it hasn't gotten near my eyes or ears. Gabapentin, 5% lidocaine, and copious quantities of weed have been the best relief. I'm buying so much lidocaine online that Amazon must think I have the worst case of hemorrhoids in history. GET THE VACCINE. NO one should have to put up with this.

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