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NEW PASSPORT CARD


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http://travel.state.gov/passport/ppt_card/ppt_card_3926.html

 

U.S. PASSPORT CARD

 

 

APPLICATIONS FOR THE U.S. PASSPORT CARD ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED!

 

Passport card applications are currently being accepted in anticipation of land border travel document requirements. Based on current projections, we expect to begin production of the passport card in June, and be in full production in July. We will provide additional updates as available.

 

 

The passport card will facilitate entry and expedite document processing at U.S. land and sea ports-of-entry when arriving from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda. The card may not be used to travel by air. It will otherwise carry the rights and privileges of the U.S. passport book and will be adjudicated to the exact same standards.

 

Note: A previous passport book holder, eligible to use Form DS-82, may apply for a passport card as a Renewal. First time applicants for a U.S. Passport, and those not eligible to use the DS-82, should apply for a passport card using Form DS-11.

 

The Department of State is issuing this passport card in response to the needs of border resident communities for a less expensive and more portable alternative to the traditional passport book. The card will have the same validity period as a passport book: 10 years for an adult, five for children 15 and younger. Adults who already have a fully valid passport book may apply for the card as a passport renewal and pay only $20. First-time applicants will pay $45 for adult cards and $35 for children.

 

To facilitate the frequent travel of U.S. citizens living in border communities and to meet DHS’s operational needs at land borders, the passport card will contain a vicinity-read radio frequency identification (RFID) chip. This chip will point to a stored record in secure government databases. There will be no personal information written to the RFID chip itself.

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In concept, I think the card is a well-intentioned idea. But, I'm not a big fan of the radio frequency technology. IMHO, it's just too easy to copy data and is a serious security issue.

 

While they "claim" it will not contain personal info, I don't necessarily believe it. But, even if personal info isn't transmitted, I don't think it would be that hard to counterfeit the chip and create bogus passport cards.

 

I think this idea is a national security nightmare waiting to happen.

 

Here's a link to an interesting article on a hacker that was able to crack the RFID passport chip.

 

http://www.p2pnet.net/story/9523

 

I don't want an RFID chip in my next passport. x(

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In concept, I think the card is a well-intentioned idea. But, I'm not a big fan of the radio frequency technology. IMHO, it's just too easy to copy data and is a serious security issue.

 

While they "claim" it will not contain personal info, I don't necessarily believe it. But, even if personal info isn't transmitted, I don't think it would be that hard to counterfeit the chip and create bogus passport cards.

 

I think this idea is a national security nightmare waiting to happen.

 

Here's a link to an interesting article on a hacker that was able to crack the RFID passport chip.

 

http://www.p2pnet.net/story/9523

 

I don't want an RFID chip in my next passport. x(

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One Finger,

 

Unless you renewed your PP last year I think you will be getting a chip the next time you do. If you did renew it last year, at least you have 9 more years of no chip.

 

What? You don't trust the US government? You think they might put some info on the chip? You think the PP is all but in name only already the US ID card? Well, you would be correct in all those things.

 

Best regards,

KMEM

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One Finger,

 

Unless you renewed your PP last year I think you will be getting a chip the next time you do. If you did renew it last year, at least you have 9 more years of no chip.

 

What? You don't trust the US government? You think they might put some info on the chip? You think the PP is all but in name only already the US ID card? Well, you would be correct in all those things.

 

Best regards,

KMEM

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It's pretty well documented online that it's very easy to 'fix' the RFID chip in a new passport--with a hammer. Just don't leave any signs that you deliberately altered your passport. Or they make shielded passport holders, supposed to prevent remote reading of an intact chip.

 

All the RFIDs *should* contain is the passport number, allowing a connected customs terminal to look up personal info. Dunno if the original passport ones contained more.

 

Don't see much point in the passport card since it can't be used for anything *other* than crossing the border by land... even if you lived on a border wouldn't all but the poorest of folks scrape up the extra for a real passport so they'd have the option of going anywhere they want? Or even flying deeper into the country you visit all the time?

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It's pretty well documented online that it's very easy to 'fix' the RFID chip in a new passport--with a hammer. Just don't leave any signs that you deliberately altered your passport. Or they make shielded passport holders, supposed to prevent remote reading of an intact chip.

 

All the RFIDs *should* contain is the passport number, allowing a connected customs terminal to look up personal info. Dunno if the original passport ones contained more.

 

Don't see much point in the passport card since it can't be used for anything *other* than crossing the border by land... even if you lived on a border wouldn't all but the poorest of folks scrape up the extra for a real passport so they'd have the option of going anywhere they want? Or even flying deeper into the country you visit all the time?

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>Don't see much point in the passport card since it can't

>be used for anything *other* than crossing the border by land...

 

It's intended for folks who live in border towns and may cross the border often just as part of their daily running around town. I would NOT want to carry a passport 24/7 but a card I could stick in my wallet wouldn't bother me.

 

RFID actually doesn't *store* anything. It's just the mechanism used to communicate with card readers. The storage they're using is EXTREMELY limited in quantity. I was surprised when I read the spec. They've got just enough room for a passport number (or other unique identifier) and some sort of checksum, all encrypted.

 

Will the encryption be broken? Oh, you betcha! Before it even hits the streets! Is there anything useful there? Nah.

 

Frankly, there are MUCH more important security risks to worry about. Like open WiFi routers. Sitting here in my ex-urban apartment in Ventura County I can get into a half-dozen of my neighbors' home networks.

 

And they're worried about an RFID device they won't normally carry around anyway. Jeez!

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>Don't see much point in the passport card since it can't

>be used for anything *other* than crossing the border by land...

 

It's intended for folks who live in border towns and may cross the border often just as part of their daily running around town. I would NOT want to carry a passport 24/7 but a card I could stick in my wallet wouldn't bother me.

 

RFID actually doesn't *store* anything. It's just the mechanism used to communicate with card readers. The storage they're using is EXTREMELY limited in quantity. I was surprised when I read the spec. They've got just enough room for a passport number (or other unique identifier) and some sort of checksum, all encrypted.

 

Will the encryption be broken? Oh, you betcha! Before it even hits the streets! Is there anything useful there? Nah.

 

Frankly, there are MUCH more important security risks to worry about. Like open WiFi routers. Sitting here in my ex-urban apartment in Ventura County I can get into a half-dozen of my neighbors' home networks.

 

And they're worried about an RFID device they won't normally carry around anyway. Jeez!

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I can see the usefulness for someone who lives along the Canadian(or Mexican) border and crosses daily, weekly, etc. Except, as I read the regulation, you can hold only one "passport" ie you can have a passport book or a passport card, but not both. So if I have a card I have to turn it in and apply for a book if I want to go to Europe.

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Guest zipperzone

>I can see the usefulness for someone who lives along the

>Canadian(or Mexican) border and crosses daily, weekly, etc.

>Except, as I read the regulation, you can hold only one

>"passport" ie you can have a passport book or a

>passport card, but not both. So if I have a card I have to

>turn it in and apply for a book if I want to go to Europe.

 

Really? And when you get back home, what then? Turn in your book and get your card back?

 

That's just plain stupid.......

 

But as it is the government that makes the rules, anything is possible.

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