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Any of you use Lifelock or something like that?


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On Tuesday I got a letter from the IRS asking me to verify if I'd filed my taxes yet, because someone using my name and SS # tried to. It must have been pretty obvious to them it wasn't me, since the return must have looked nothing like my previous years' (I usually owe a bit, not the other way around). Upon their advice, I also notified the FTC, local law enforcement, and the credit bureaus. I got my computer scanned with Webroot Secure Anywhere, and surprisingly, no threats/malware was found. I also called the state income tax officials, and, also surprisingly to me, they didn't try to file a state income tax return. My domestic partner suggested I subscribe to Lifelock as well. Have any of you used them or a similar service? What's your opinion of this?

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I've also heard negative reports on LifeLock. But, I have enrolled in the idexperts insurance program. I've had 1 credit card hacked a couple of times and they provided great help in making sure my ID was protected. And, if my ID is comprised, they will provide someone to handle the paperwork to get things resolved.

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On Tuesday I got a letter from the IRS asking me to verify if I'd filed my taxes yet, because someone using my name and SS # tried to. It must have been pretty obvious to them it wasn't me, since the return must have looked nothing like my previous years' (I usually owe a bit, not the other way around). Upon their advice, I also notified the FTC, local law enforcement, and the credit bureaus. I got my computer scanned with Webroot Secure Anywhere, and surprisingly, no threats/malware was found. I also called the state income tax officials, and, also surprisingly to me, they didn't try to file a state income tax return. My domestic partner suggested I subscribe to Lifelock as well. Have any of you used them or a similar service? What's your opinion of this?

Just an article on the 11 PM news about the increase in this kind of fraud. Seems all you need is the SSN and a good imagination. NO W2 No other ID except a number to submit the online form. According to the news, SSN are being obtained from hospitals and insurance claims. Glad to hear you are a near victim rather than a victim.

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Lifelock was fined by the FTC for making false claims about its services. They were forced to change their advertising as well. I think they were making it difficult for people to cancel the service. As well as implying it's a stronger form of protection than regular credit monitoring.

 

I use Experion to monitor my credit and am pretty satisfied.

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On Tuesday I got a letter from the IRS asking me to verify if I'd filed my taxes yet, because someone using my name and SS # tried to. It must have been pretty obvious to them it wasn't me, since the return must have looked nothing like my previous years' (I usually owe a bit, not the other way around). Upon their advice, I also notified the FTC, local law enforcement, and the credit bureaus. I got my computer scanned with Webroot Secure Anywhere, and surprisingly, no threats/malware was found. I also called the state income tax officials, and, also surprisingly to me, they didn't try to file a state income tax return. My domestic partner suggested I subscribe to Lifelock as well. Have any of you used them or a similar service? What's your opinion of this?

 

Yes, I use them and am very pleased. Over the past year and a half they detected two separate attempts to use my information to secure significant credit. It was stopped, following contacting me and verifying that the applicant was not myself. They also were instrumental in finding out how the two individuals secured my personal data via imaging magnetic information from a corporate credit card. The best money I have spent, frankly.

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If you are an AAA member, they provide monthly credit monitoring for free as part of the membership. I also think you need to be proactive.....I frequently check my credit card charges online, as well as my bank accounts. One of my credit cards was hacked and I discovered it myself before the monitor notified me.

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https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2010/03/lifelock-will-pay-12-million-settle-charges-ftc-35-states

 

The link above has details on the $12 million fine levied by the FTC and 35 state attorneys general against Lifelock for deceptive practices. In short, Lifelock made claims about its services that were not true. The protection offered was no better than any of the competition in the market.

 

See below for key details about Lifelock's claims versus what was actually offered to consumers.

"While LifeLock promised consumers complete protection against all types of identity theft, in truth, the protection it actually provided left enough holes that you could drive a truck through it,” said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz.

 

“This agreement effectively prevents LifeLock from misrepresenting that its services offer absolute prevention against identity theft because there is unfortunately no foolproof way to avoid ID theft,” Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan said. “Consumers can take definitive steps to minimize the chances of having their personal information stolen, and this settlement will help them make more informed decisions about whether to enroll in ID theft protection services.”

 

Since 2006, LifeLock’s ads have claimed that it could prevent identity theft for consumers willing to sign up for its $10-a-month service.

 

According to the FTC’s complaint, LifeLock has claimed:

  • “By now you’ve heard about individuals whose identities have been stolen by identity thieves . . . LifeLock protects against this ever happening to you. Guaranteed.”
  • “Please know that we are the first company to prevent identity theft from occurring.”
  • “Do you ever worry about identity theft? If so, it’s time you got to know LifeLock. We work to stop identity theft before it happens.”

The FTC’s complaint charged that the fraud alerts that LifeLock placed on customers’ credit files protected only against certain forms of identity theft and gave them no protection against the misuse of existing accounts, the most common type of identity theft. It also allegedly provided no protection against medical identity theft or employment identity theft, in which thieves use personal information to get medical care or apply for jobs. And even for types of identity theft for which fraud alerts are most effective, they do not provide absolute protection. They alert creditors opening new accounts to take reasonable measures to verify that the individual applying for credit actually is who he or she claims to be, but in some instances, identity thieves can thwart even reasonable precautions.

 

New account fraud, the type of identity theft for which fraud alerts are most effective, comprised only 17 percent of identity theft incidents, according to an FTC survey released in 2007.

 

The FTC’s complaint further alleged that LifeLock also claimed that it would prevent unauthorized changes to customers’ address information, that it constantly monitored activity on customer credit reports, and that it would ensure that a customer always would receive a telephone call from a potential creditor before a new account was opened. The FTC charged that those claims were false.

 

In addition to its deceptive identity theft protection claims, LifeLock allegedly made claims about its own data security that were not true. According to the FTC, LifeLock routinely collected sensitive information from its customers, including their social security numbers and credit card numbers. The company claimed:

  • “Only authorized employees of LifeLock will have access to the data that you provide to us, and that access is granted only on a ‘need to know’ basis.”
  • “All stored personal data is electronically encrypted.”
  • “LifeLock uses highly secure physical, electronic, and managerial procedures to safeguard the confidentiality and security of the data you provide to us.”

The FTC charged that LifeLock’s data was not encrypted, and sensitive consumer information was not shared only on a “need to know” basis. In fact, the agency charged, the company’s data system was vulnerable and could have been exploited by those seeking access to customer information."

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