Jump to content

The imitation game. Honoring Alan Turing's memory the man who saved Britain in WW2!


marylander1940
This topic is 3341 days old and is no longer open for new replies.  Replies are automatically disabled after two years of inactivity.  Please create a new topic instead of posting here.  

Recommended Posts

The Imitation Game is a 2014 British-American historical drama film about British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing, a key figure in cracking Nazi Germany's Enigma code that helped the Allies win World War II, only to later be criminally prosecuted for his homosexuality.

 

A man who unlocked the mysteries of the enigma machine, saved the UK from a certain defeat caused by submarine war blockade and was castrated for his homosexuality by the same government he served.

 

[video=youtube;S5CjKEFb-sM]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5CjKEFb-sM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... homosexual acts in private between two men were only decriminalised in the UK in 1967.

 

Amazing!

 

Anal sex, and sometimes even oral sex or non missionary positions for vaginal sex, were illegal in many states till 2002 even for married couples. Scalia warned conservatives that legalizing anal sex with bring the legalization of gay marriage in the future, thank God he was right on this one!

 

http://www.bartcop.com/Scalia_pig.jpg

 

Cuccinelli (former attorney General and failed Republican candidate for Governor) wanted to make anal and oral sex illegal again in VA against the wishes of those "activist judges in the Supreme Court that gave us the right to butt fuck each other.

 

Map of anal sex by state till the SCJ overruled state laws, and gave us the right to do it so we can destroy the country from inside. :rolleyes: (sarcasm)

 

http://www.motherjones.com/files/images/sodomy_map.jpg

 

http://s3-ec.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr01/2013/7/22/13/enhanced-buzz-6582-1374513326-17.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually I did read it and I see now that you were the originator. I wasn't aware it was forbidden to post similar threads.

I was keen to discuss the man and the results of his work and also the merits of the film than the history of sodomy in American states. As important as that is of course!

 

 

nothing is forbidden unless Daddy sez so...

 

I happen to be one of the very few guys on here who search before posting.

I know it's tricky to search for words shorter than 4 letters but I do my best, I was scolded after starting a new thread about the movie "Fed up"... but I do search before posting a new thread.

 

Let's talk about sodomy and everything else we want.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

"Watching “The Imitation Game” is like seeing a bottle of Cheval Blanc fed into a Slurpee machine..."

 

It can't be that bad, not with those stars and directors, I hope it will be Oscar quality

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I saw it last night and loved it. Very depressing though - I came away with much of the same feelings I had leaving "Milk". I don't know if the movie is accurate on this point, but the reason he was prosecuted was that his home was broken into, and the police officer investigating was curious about Turing's lack of concern, and followed a train of thought that led him to believe that he might be a communist spy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Conviction for indecency

 

In January 1952, Turing, then 39, started a relationship with Arnold Murray, a 19-year-old unemployed man. Turing met Murray just before Christmas outside the Regal Cinema when walking down Manchester's Oxford Road and had invited him to lunch. On 23 January Turing's house was burgled. Murray told Turing that the burglar was an acquaintance of his, and Turing reported the crime to the police. During the investigation he acknowledged a sexual relationship with Murray. Homosexual acts were criminal offences in the United Kingdom at that time,[102] and both men were charged with gross indecency under Section 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885.[103] Initial committal proceedings for the trial occurred on 27 February, where Turing's solicitor "reserved his defence".

 

Later, convinced by the advice of his brother and other lawyers, Turing entered a plea of "guilty", in spite of the fact that he felt no remorse or guilt for having committed acts of homosexuality.[104] The case, Regina v. Turing and Murray, was brought to trial on 31 March 1952,[105] when Turing was convicted and given a choice between imprisonment and probation, which would be conditional on his agreement to undergo hormonal treatment designed to reduce libido. He accepted the option of treatment via injections of stilboestrol, a synthetic oestrogen; this treatment was continued for the course of one year. The treatment rendered Turing impotent and caused gynaecomastia,[106] fulfilling in the literal sense Turing's prediction that "no doubt I shall emerge from it all a different man, but quite who I've not found out".[107][108] Murray was given a conditional discharge.[109]

 

Turing's conviction led to the removal of his security clearance and barred him from continuing with his cryptographic consultancy for the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the British signals intelligence agency that had evolved from GC&CS in 1946 (though he kept his academic job). He was denied entry into the United States after his conviction in 1952, but was free to visit other European countries, even though this was viewed by some as a security risk. At the time, there was acute public anxiety about homosexual entrapment of spies by Soviet agents,[110] because of the recent exposure of the first two members of the Cambridge Five, Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean, as KGB double agents. Turing was never accused of espionage, but in common with all who had worked at Bletchley Park, he was prevented by the Official Secrets Act from discussing his war work.[111]"

 

Source:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing#Conviction_for_indecency

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest boiworship08
"Conviction for indecency

 

In January 1952, Turing, then 39, started a relationship with Arnold Murray, a 19-year-old unemployed man. Turing met Murray just before Christmas outside the Regal Cinema when walking down Manchester's Oxford Road and had invited him to lunch. On 23 January Turing's house was burgled. Murray told Turing that the burglar was an acquaintance of his, and Turing reported the crime to the police. During the investigation he acknowledged a sexual relationship with Murray. Homosexual acts were criminal offences in the United Kingdom at that time,[102] and both men were charged with gross indecency under Section 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885.[103] Initial committal proceedings for the trial occurred on 27 February, where Turing's solicitor "reserved his defence".

 

Later, convinced by the advice of his brother and other lawyers, Turing entered a plea of "guilty", in spite of the fact that he felt no remorse or guilt for having committed acts of homosexuality.[104] The case, Regina v. Turing and Murray, was brought to trial on 31 March 1952,[105] when Turing was convicted and given a choice between imprisonment and probation, which would be conditional on his agreement to undergo hormonal treatment designed to reduce libido. He accepted the option of treatment via injections of stilboestrol, a synthetic oestrogen; this treatment was continued for the course of one year. The treatment rendered Turing impotent and caused gynaecomastia,[106] fulfilling in the literal sense Turing's prediction that "no doubt I shall emerge from it all a different man, but quite who I've not found out".[107][108] Murray was given a conditional discharge.[109]

 

Turing's conviction led to the removal of his security clearance and barred him from continuing with his cryptographic consultancy for the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the British signals intelligence agency that had evolved from GC&CS in 1946 (though he kept his academic job). He was denied entry into the United States after his conviction in 1952, but was free to visit other European countries, even though this was viewed by some as a security risk. At the time, there was acute public anxiety about homosexual entrapment of spies by Soviet agents,[110] because of the recent exposure of the first two members of the Cambridge Five, Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean, as KGB double agents. Turing was never accused of espionage, but in common with all who had worked at Bletchley Park, he was prevented by the Official Secrets Act from discussing his war work.[111]"

 

Source:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing#Conviction_for_indecency

God, how far we've come.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought this was a wonderful movie, one of the best of the year. It does not focus on Turing's homosexuality, but discusses it fully and candidly at the end. What a brilliant man, and how shabbily and cruelly he was treated by his government and by society. As someone recently posted here, how far we've come!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...