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I'm finished!


Samai139
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Seaboy~~

You have taken the FIRST and perhaps most important step in quitting:

You have decided YOU want to quit, you set a date and you did it.

Way to go, congratulations!!

I smoked for nearly 30 years, and then one memorable day, May 29, 1985, I decided that was it---no more cigarettes. I've stuck to that and not had one since and will not, because I know if I have ONE, I'll be right back to the pack+ per day habit.

If you are willing to listen to some advice from an "old man" may I recommend that you keep track of how long it's been since your last cigarette? I think you are already doing it, but it helps if you keep on at least for those hellish first few days, weeks. Eventually, you will hit the one month mark and then you will feel a real sense of accomplishment, and NOT want to start all over again.

If you need someone to "chat" with when it gets tempting to start---feel free---I'm here and would be glad to help.

You can do it, believe.

Buzz

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Seaboy, why did it take so long? You have been one of the most rational people on this website. I would never had the thought that you were tempted to the wicked evil.

 

I smoked since the age of 16-say 1954. In 1987 i said 'this is it". been good ever since.

 

Mind you, I have been "smokin" big dicks ever since.

All the best. Private e-mail if you would like some encouragement. R.

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Good for you! You know, the body has an enormous capacity to heal; you will be surprised how good you feel in a very short time.

 

But if cravings get to you, and you "fall of the wagon," do NOT see this as defeat. Some quit "cold turkey," others have a few stops and starts.

 

Don't give up -- and just think of the money you will save!

 

-North

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>Good for you! You know, the body has an enormous capacity to

>heal; you will be surprised how good you feel in a very short

>time.

>

>But if cravings get to you, and you "fall of the

>wagon," do NOT see this as defeat. Some quit "cold

>turkey," others have a few stops and starts.

 

 

Cold turkey, no outside assistance, is the toughest way to go, so I am glad you are at least using the Nicotine gum. Chantix is a relatively new prescription drug, nicotine receptor blocker and it greatly increases your chances of stopping. So if you start to feel the urge to smoke or if you actually go back to smoking, consider getting Chantix from your doctor.

Good luck. Stopping smoking is probably the best single thing you can do to improve your health and well being.

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Well I've decided it is time for me to officially say good bye. It's been a nice run but it is time to quit. I've been thinking about this long and hard but it's time and has been time for quite a while now. Now before anyone gets upset let me clarify that I am talking about quitting smoking. Over 10 years is way too long and I have been lucky that smoking hasn't prematurely made me look older then I really am (32) but I think having dad's good genes has helped. About an hour ago I smoked my last ciggie and am currently sucking on a piece of nicotine gum. I really hope that this time that I really quit. Boobers now has been smoke free for about a month but he is usually stronger at this type of stuff then I am so we'll see but I am trying to keep a positive outlook on this as I know over coming most any addiction is mental.

 

Hugs,

Greg

seaboy4hire@yahoo.com

http://seaboy4hire.tripod.com http://www.daddysreviews.com/newest.php?who=greg_seattle

http://img182.imageshack.us/img182/6707/lebec084a9ad147f620acd5ps8.jpg

I need a holiday!

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RE: I'm finished!

 

Congratulations. I quit on January 13, 1987 when my doctor called with test results that showed severely damaged lung capacity on the way to emphysema. I was about to light up when he called. I didn't. I put the cigs away and never had another one. About two months later my appetite increased enormously (I would eat a big dinner, then an hour later want to go out for Big Mac, giant fries, and shake). This craving went away in about six months.

 

The poster who said that cold turkey is the hardest way to go is right, but cold turkey is the best way to go, from my own experience, my father's, and many friends who have quit over the years. All you have to do is really want to stop.

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Guest carter07

Seaboy, go for it! And I concur that cold turkey is tough but it's the best way to go. I quit in 1996, after smoking for about 40 years and trying to quit several times, the night before some major surgery that kept me in hospital for a week. That week of incarceration of course eased the withdrawal pain considerably and I've never wanted a cigarette since. So just do your damndest to hang in there; the urge will pass and you will feel oh so much better.

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A NEW BEGINNING

 

You have a whole new stage of your life beginning now. It will involve new delicious smells, savory tastes and no longer having to be treated like a social outcast.

 

After 45 years on the sticks, last October I finally quit. Like Oliver, I used the Chantix Rx. While there were side effects, I consider the trade off worth it. The trick is you have to be ready to be a non smoker, otherwise nothing really will work long term.

 

I am not a reformed smoker on the war path. It doesn't bother me to be near other smokers.

 

Congratulations Greg.

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RE: A NEW BEGINNING

 

I too am happy for you! Cold turkey is the only thing that helped me quit. I tried to phase out cigs, use nicotine gum, only smoke outside when home and ease off 1 per day.... none of that worked for me. When I did the freezing foul thing it just worked because IT WAS OVER! No options, no choices other than DON'T SMOKE!

 

Food tastes better, smelling turns into a joyful event, walking up hill becomes doable, and your body smells better and your mouth is kissable!

 

GOOD LUCK TO YOU!!! Be a nike and JUST DO IT!:+

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Guest GladImGay

Greg, So happy for you. It will be great seeing you next month here in Chicago. I think I've told you that I stopped in 1990 when my addiction was up to 3 packs a day. Like yourself I did it "cold turkey". I used to be a pipe smoker and had saved several of my old pipes. Because of some ideas I'd read about. I pulled one from the box and walked around with it in my pocket, in my hand, or in my mouth (without any tobacco, of course). The act of smoking for me was a lot more than the nicotine, it was a tactile issue. Having something to replace the cigarette in a physical sense made it a lot easier. I've heard people say they used a pencil or pen just as I used my old pipe. Today, as your know, I don't smoke or drink (as a recovering alcoholic). Some 18 years since my last smoke and 23 years after my last drink, I can't tolerate being around smokers, but drinking doesn't bother me. The thought of smoking is so repulsive, but the occaisional thought of drinking is still there. I would be far more apt to pick up a drink than a cigarette. Call me, please, if you want to talk about it.

Ed

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The act of smoking for me was a lot more

>than the nicotine, it was a tactile issue. Having something to

>replace the cigarette in a physical sense made it a lot

>easier. I've heard people say they used a pencil or pen just

>as I used my old pipe.

 

 

For me it was toothpicks. I chewed them a lot. Then three days ago the doctor told me I had Dutch Elm disease. x( :+

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Good for you, Greg!

 

I quit on June 1 after 35 years of 2+ packs/day.

 

Just a word about the Chantix advice you're getting: leave it as a last resort. It is the most aggressive (and also the most expensive) of the Rx options. Ask your doctor for a rundown of the options rather than for a specific drug, if you even need to go there. (There are MANY options, ranging from mood-altering drugs to "nicorette" inhalers.)

 

Your Dr. may advise starting with something less aggressive, leaving a path for more. Would be kinda a bummer to have the big guns fail and nowhere to go.

 

And if you don't feel like gum some days, Commit lozenges have worked for me. Just put it between your gum and your cheek and let it dissolve.

 

The first 21 days are toughest. But you've already done the REALLY hard part: deciding it's time.

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Good for you, Greg! Smoking is so hard to quit, but so worth the effort! You'll start feeling a lot healthier in just a few days. I got hooked, like a lot of other guys, when I was in the service, and was up to 2 1/2 packs a day when I quit cold turkey on November 10, 1991 (Marine Corps birthday).

dan

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Everyone thanks for the kind words. I am on day four now. First couple days weren't too bad except for after I got back from my lunch/dinner Sunday night at work and I almost snapped, it really wasn't pretty and it lasted till early last evening but after coming back from my first break I was in a much better mood the rest of the night. I even was able to beat one of my triggers going out for coffee at our favorite coffee place and sitting socializing with others there and many smoke. It wasn't easy and I almost wanted to leave but I forced myself to stay and deal with it, knowing that running wasn't going to help me. I leave for Chicago in a couple weeks and of course will go out for at least one night and that'll be another test, having a couple drinks and not running out to smoke. I'll still be on the gum I think by then so that'll help out a bit. With any addiction I know that one has to take it a day at a time a minute at a time. Well time to grab some breaky and terrorize a waiter friend at his resteraunt >:)

 

Hugs,

Greg

seaboy4hire@yahoo.com

http://seaboy4hire.tripod.com http://www.daddysreviews.com/newest.php?who=greg_seattle

http://img182.imageshack.us/img182/6707/lebec084a9ad147f620acd5ps8.jpg

I need a holiday!

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Seaboy~~

Congratulations on four days and counting!!! Way to go. If you can manage to get through the first four days, and be around other smokers, you certainly can get through the rest of your life, smoke-free. Don't give in. Count each and every day and soon, very soon, you will begin to feel and taste the results :)))

Please keep letting us know how you are doing. There are lots of us who are in your corner.

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Today is day 6 and probably the biggest test for not reaching for that pack of Kamel Filters. I was told a while ago that my stepdad was seeing a Dr for issues with a syst (sp) but he spent 7 hours in sergery Wed and found out it was cancer in his pancreis (sp). The Dr says 2-5 months. I'm praying knowing he's a strong guy he'll pull through and beat this. I do belive in miricles and what not and I do belive in a higher power. I'm just kind of numb right now and rambeling. I'm sorry for the misspellings but I'm mobile and just trying to take this all in. Fast quick death I can handle, but slow death I can not.

 

Hugs,

Greg

seaboy4hire@yahoo.com

http://seaboy4hire.tripod.com http://www.daddysreviews.com/newest.php?who=greg_seattle

http://img182.imageshack.us/img182/6707/lebec084a9ad147f620acd5ps8.jpg

I need a holiday!

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Greg,

Tough, tough news. Your step-dad and his battle will of course be a prime concern, and add to your difficulty in quitting. BUT thinking about someone else and their bigger battle might just take your mind away from tobacco and the urge to light up.

Spend as much time as possible with him. Let him know that he is not alone and value each day for what it is. Two to five months may or may not be factual---it could be much more, or much less. Don't fret that, but say all those things that haven't been said before, or not recently. From my experience in living with a dying father you'll be amazed at the range of emotions you'll be going through, from fierce anger to sumission to surrender to joy. Joy? Yes, there will be moments, and you need to cherish them.

Hang in there, you have now passed the first week milestone---it WILL get easier and easier, trust me.

Let me know how you're doing,

Buzz

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