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Guest ryan2552
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Guest ryan2552

I have seen many threads about recipes and other food related topics. But none related to cookware. I'm interested in knowing what type of cookware you men enjoy making your edible creations in?

 

For the past two years I've been using non-stick hard anodized. At first I was somewhat concerned about getting a good sear using non stick. I soon found out since my cookware is hard anodized I could cook at a high enough heat to where searing has not been an issue.

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Guest RandyRon

A few years ago, I bought myself a set of All-Clad cookware. It's stainless on both the inside and outside so it's easy to clean and it has a thick inner layer of aluminum which makes it heat uniformly. Also, the stainless means you don't have to worry about using acids such as wine or vinegar and you can go to town with the whip when you need to without worrying about damaging the non-stick coating. I can recommend it whole heartedly. I still have a non-stick skillet for certain chores.

 

I also won't give up my cast-iron skillets that I inherited from my grandmother. They're over a 100 years old, perfectly seasoned and don't require anything other than a rinse with plain water to clean.

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LaCrueset cookware is great for soups, stews, roasts, casseroles (does anyone still bake casseroles?!). Some pieces can be used for stovetop preparation, then popped into the oven. They hold heat beautifully and evenly, thought they won't take high heat. I've hardly used my slow cooker since I acquired the Crueset dutch oven and other pieces in their line. Well worth the high price tags. And the colors are great. Mix and match, Jane!

 

I also just purchased a Wustoff 8" kitchen knife and love it. Again, worth the tariff.

 

 

 

"I'd say that's a bit of an extreme reaction, now wouldn't you?" -- N.F. Bates

 

 

Lankypeters

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Now this is a cooking issue over which I agonized for years. I have tried just about every type of fry pan known to god and man. I DO NOT like All-Clad. I tried their top of the line large skillet ($200+) and hated it. I do a lot of searing and sautéing. The main problem with All Clad stainless steel is that it takes too long to release the item when sautéing. When this happen either the item is over cooked or the breading sticks to the pan. I really don’t care for nonstick pans as they DO NOT brown to my liking. I like RandyRon I have a complete set of well seasoned cast iron which works like a charm. I have also found on http://www.chefscatalgo.com some French Carbon Steel Fry Pans (item 22362) that I really like. They work wonderfully, season quickly and are inexpensive. They are, however, heavy and when used regularly they are not pretty and shiny.

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Guest ryan2552

>LaCrueset cookware is great for soups, stews, roasts,

>casseroles (does anyone still bake casseroles?!).

 

I haven't in years but now I want to :) I'm going to give it a try again this weekend. Maybe some type of beef or chicken casserole would be nice. Do you happen to have a good recipe?

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>LaCrueset cookware is great

 

Yup. I got rid of the slow-cooker entirely when I got the LeCrueset dutch oven. And I don't use even *that* so much since I got the smoker.

 

Where I used to slow roast a brisket, it's so much better hickory-smoked. You just have to get used to everything on the patio reeking of hickory smoke. :p And smoking typically takes longer than traditional roasting.

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Deej I was given a Bradley Smoker (made in Canada) two years ago for Christmas and I love it. However, if you think hickory smells up the backyard try mesquite sometime. I love Texas hill country barbeque and the wood of choice in that part of the world is definitely mesquite. I actually try to get to the area around Austin, Texas at least once every two years or so just to gorge myself. I anybody would like to do home smoking I can't recommend the Bradley Smoker highly enough -- it's fantastic especially the digital one.

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Allclad is the best. However they are a bit heavy and it is hard to clean sometimes. Food sometimes stains inside the pan. Le creuset are good as well but they are also heavy. I still need a non-stick frying pan.

 

I have recently bought the ceramic knife... and it is among the best. It is even better than global. I learned not to put my knife in the dishwasher machine.

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The Bradley looks cool, but I went with a unit from cookshack.com because it's smaller and electric. Being a renter, electric works when they won't accept any kind of open flame. I live in wildfire country, of course. Any "smoke" smell gets the neighbors in a panic.

 

But yeah, after I've used mesquite I'll burn a piece of alder with no meat in the smoker just because it helps dissipate the smell. (And the extra burn makes cleanup easier too.)

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I got an Emile Henry ceramic stewpot for my sister at Christmas and got a chance to work with it a bit. It's a lot of fun to cook with, holds heat and spreads it around really well. It's a special ceramic that you can use over an open flame as well as the oven. You can use it like a Le Creuset pot, except that it's much lighter since there's no metal.

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