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Cell Phone Privacy???....


doctordoctor
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Hey All...

 

used Intelius to see if they have my name available by searching via my cell phone number (for a fee)......yes, they do!....

 

it's only a pay-as-you-go deal, no contract, but I guess they have my name on record somehow....maybe my credit card when I recharge it??...

 

I do make the occasional call to an escort and am now somewhat nervous about privacy as my name is evidently available if they decided to search around a bit....the guys I've met with are well-reviewed, so maybe nothing to fear, but still concerned a good bit....

 

if any of you are knowledgeable about this, is there any way to get my name to be unavailable - without changing numbers?....

 

there was some national press several months ago about names being available online for those searching cell numbers and the resultant privacy concern....

 

thanks for your comments and advice...

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>Hey All...

>

>used Intelius to see if they have my name available by

>searching via my cell phone number (for a fee)......yes, they

>do!....

>

>I do make the occasional call to an escort and am now somewhat

>nervous about privacy as my name is evidently available if

>they decided to search around a bit....the guys I've met with

>are well-reviewed, so maybe nothing to fear, but still

>concerned a good bit....

>

>if any of you are knowledgeable about this, is there any way

>to get my name to be unavailable - without changing

>numbers?....

******************************************************************

There is no way to be invisible in this age of computers and information. If you are nervous about your name being available through your cell phone number, you would be astonished to learn what information can be obtained about you or anyone else.

 

For example, more than two years ago I had a problem with a several individuals who had threatened to cause harm to me and to my reputation because I disagreed with them. As a result of the threats, I hired an attorney. The attorney hired a private detective to build a dossier on those who were involved in the threats. Information about those individuals was needed in the event it became necessary to involve the police or other authorities.

 

Among other things, the private detective came up with a Social Security number and passport number for each of those involved. He also obtained the date of birth for each involved, banks account numbers (with copies of deposits and withdrawals from each persons’ bank accounts), names of employers for those still working for companies, current and former addresses of each involved, criminal records (on two of the people involved) as well as medical records relating to a mental disorder for one of the individuals involved. The detective also obtained the dates of entry into and out of the United States for each person involved, the dates and amounts of large cash withdrawals from bank accounts by two of the individuals involved, copies of every incoming and outgoing e-mails of those involved. There was other information presented to me but I no longer recall exactly what was obtained nor do I have access to the information any longer since it is being stored by my attorney. Fortunately, those involved came to their senses and stopped their threats so the matter never had to be sent to the authorities.

 

In view of the above facts, you should not waste time trying to have your name dissociated from your cell phone number; it would be futile because if someone really wants to find you or find things about you, they can do it. Like it or not, each person in this modern age leaves a trail that any competent detective can track and uncover.

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doctordoctor,

I have the same type of 'go phone' with no contract and I used my stage name when I got the phone. I never used my credit card to recharge it and I paid cash each time. Out of curiosity I went online at Intelius.com to check what kind of information they have for my number and guess what ... the data is wrong and has nothing to do with me.

 

Steven Draker ~

[a href=http://www.hotsexystud.com/uk]website[/a] [a href=http://www.daddysreviews.com/review.php?who=steven_draker_brussels]reviews[/a]

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There's a lot more freely available information out there than any of us would like to think. Some years ago I was almost the victim of identity theft. And it was perpetrated by someone who at the time was supposed to be a friend. Fortunately I was able to interdict this situation early on and put a stop to it. And obviously the individual is no longer a friend nor do we associate.

 

Just recently, an idiot in my employer's Human Resources department downloaded on to his laptop the personal information of over 3,000 of our US based staff and dependents. He then went on to an unsecured wireless network and downloaded a sports related video clip which contained a virus. Guess what, the personal data of over 14,000 current and former employees plus their dependents was compromised. End result, we all have a year's worth of free credit monitoring and the cost to the organization is rapidly approaching a half million bucks.

 

Having been through stolen check reorder nightmares, stolen by an employee of the US Postal Service no less, plus all of the above I have become philosophical about these matters. Even before the internet there were ways of obtaining personal information on someone. The internet has only made it easier and more readily available. Cell phone information is just the tip of the ice berg.

 

Everyone needs to be diligent about their personal data but don't let all these news stories make you paranoid. The media trumps up a lot of things just to sell ratings. If you are concerned that the escorts you hire may do a background search on you I think you are being a bit unrealistic.

 

I'd say you have more to worry about from a friend or close associate than you do some escort compromising your privacy. Most escorts hardly return an e-mail in a timely fashion so I doubt there's enough motivation to do background checks on every client. You have nothing to worry about.

 

My advice would be chill out, don't go off the deep end about these matters but take steps to ensure your privacy where you can. Pay as you go cell phones is an option if you are that worried but don't think it's a panacea.

 

Oh and that former friend who tried to steal my identity? Well...he now works for Bank of America. How he passed the background checks with my police report and all is a wonder. I closed all my accounts with BOA and moved to another bank. ;-)

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Guest zipperzone

>Just recently, an idiot in my employer's Human Resources

>department downloaded on to his laptop the personal

>information of over 3,000 of our US based staff and

>dependents. He then went on to an unsecured wireless network

>and downloaded a sports related video clip which contained a

>virus. Guess what, the personal data of over 14,000 current

>and former employees plus their dependents was compromised.

>End result, we all have a year's worth of free credit

>monitoring and the cost to the organization is rapidly

>approaching a half million bucks.

 

I would hope that the idiot is no longer employed by your agency!

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Hey doctordoctor,

 

This is an issue I have researched. Most cellphone companies do not release the names associated with phone numbers--you can call your carrier to verify. The email threats about them going public with that information are generally scams.

 

However, what tends to happen is that you give your cellphone number to a merchant, to a website, to a profession organization, to your employer (and his/her database), to a creditcard company, to any number of possible sources and it gets "out there" in the searchable cyber universe--your phone number and your "real" name linked together in nefarious cybercouplings.

 

The only way to absolutely protect your identity behind the number is to NEVER link the two in any direct way. For instance, I have two cellphones. One number (my personal phone) is quickly and easily traced directly to me because that number I have given out publicly for several years using my real name. The other number (on the same account) is my escort line, which I have never associated with my real name and, at least when I last checked, comes up with a false name when searched--probably the name of the person who had the number before me.

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Working in the media we have access to unbelievable personal information. You'd be amazed, shocked rather, at what a LexisNexis search (and other methods which were previously only available to Law Enforcement and the CIA/FBI) can reveal.

 

Also, there are numerous "spyware" programs that will allow you to view EVERYTHING once it has been (unknowingly) downloaded on the "victims" computer. Every key-stroke, e-mail, AIM instant message..everything and it's undetectable with your average spy-ware /virus protection software! Your phone number, IP address, social security number, etc. all can get linked. Every website you visit is recorded.

 

There's really no such thing as "off-the-record" and people today "leak" information all the time.

 

A radio station I used to work for, many years ago, would have people fill-out "contest entry forms" only to "harvest" their personal information for marketing purposes. They would later SELL your personal information to telemarketing agencies (back in the day before the DO NOT CALL list existed)... but you get the idea.

 

No "IP scrambler" can stop your internet provider from still seing everything you do, especially if law enforcement (or other government agency) has a search warrant.

 

A gay video porn shop adamantly told me "we wil never sell or mail you anything to your home address" only years later the gay material started coming in (and im in the closet).

 

Those are pretty bad examples, but the Bottom line- almost nothing is private.

 

The list is shocking on what's REALLY available out there to anyone(professional detective or otherwise) who has the time and resources available.

 

There are ways to protect yourself (ask any truly famous celebrity), but as someone (Deej ?) on here once said" "if you can't handle getting exposed, then don't do the deed"...or something like that. :)

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>No "IP scrambler" can stop your internet provider from still

>seing everything you do, especially if law enforcement (or

>other government agency) has a search warrant.

 

...Don't say things like that! Our current and possibly future administrations do not need to be bothered with such childish things as a search warrant. Please re submit your post with current facts.

:D :-)

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