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Turn About Is Fair Play-1966 Style!


Gar1eth
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It's interesting to me. Some of the harmonies the Andrews' Sisters hit on these songs remind me of the vocal harmony used by the Sweet Adelines (female barbershop). I don't know enough about music. But I know barbershop music hits chords in the middle of the scale. I prefer the alternate chords the Supremes seem to hit although the Andrews sisters didn't do a bad job on the Supremes' music.

 

It's so weird watching this in 2016. At the time of this show LaVerne would have been 54-55 (my current age), Maxine would have been 49-50, and Patty would have been 43-44.

 

Diana Ross was 22 (71 now), Mary Wilson was 22 (71 now), and Florence Ballard was 23 (died at the age of 32 from coronary thrombosis-heart attack). I'm

 

Gmat

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Thank you, Gman. I can not possible do better, but here is something.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoO2PtWfuWg

 

I wish there had been video. Ahh the Astrodome. The Eighth Wonder Of The World. I used to live a mile from it when I was younger (so much younger than today. I never needed help in anyway.).

 

Gman

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It's interesting to me. Some of the harmonies the Andrews' Sisters hit on these songs remind me of the vocal harmony used by the Sweet Adelines (female barbershop). I don't know enough about music. But I know barbershop music hits chords in the middle of the scale. I prefer the alternate chords the Supremes seem to hit although the Andrews sisters didn't do a bad job on the Supremes' music.

 

It's so weird watching this in 2016. At the time of this show LaVerne would have been 54-55 (my current age), Maxine would have been 49-50, and Patty would have been 43-44.

 

Diana Ross was 22 (71 now), Mary Wilson was 22 (71 now), and Florence Ballard was 23 (died at the age of 32 from coronary thrombosis-heart attack). I'm

 

Gman

 

I find it quite interesting that the Andrews Sisters' arrangements of the Supreme songs were in 1940's big band harmonies, which did not always work here but the Supremes' arrangements sounded very like the original Andrews Sisters' harmony. I could be mistaken but it sounded as if Diana Ross sang some of the harmony parts in some of it. Of course the reason the Andrews' version of the Supremes didn't sound like the Supremes is because all of the hit Supremes songs featured were originally hits with Diana Ross singing the melody and both Flo and Mary basically singing the backup vocals.

 

To me, when they sang the Andrews Sisters's they were more successful than the Andrews singing their own 3-part harmony on the Supremes' songs with an equal 3 voices. Different styles. Supremes Motown sound, Andrews big band sound. I was always a great fan of both. Too young for the Andrews but my mom had a lot of their hits on those old shellac 78's!

 

Gman, the close harmony of Barbershop arrangements are indeed not too far from the 3-part harmonies of the girl trios during the big band era! The barbershop just has more voices, all the way up to 6 different parts at times!

 

TruHart1 :cool:

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I find it quite interesting that the Andrews Sisters' arrangements of the Supreme songs were in 1940's big band harmonies, which did not always work here but the Supremes' arrangements sounded very like the original Andrews Sisters' harmony. I could be mistaken but it sounded as if Diana Ross sang some of the harmony parts in some of it. Of course the reason the Andrews' version of the Supremes didn't sound like the Supremes is because all of the hit Supremes songs featured were originally hits with Diana Ross singing the melody and both Flo and Mary basically singing the backup vocals.

 

To me, when they sang the Andrews Sisters's they were more successful than the Andrews singing their own 3-part harmony on the Supremes' songs with an equal 3 voices. Different styles. Supremes Motown sound, Andrews big band sound. I was always a great fan of both. Too young for the Andrews but my mom had a lot of their hits on those old shellac 78's!

 

Gman, the close harmony of Barbershop arrangements are indeed not too far from the 3-part harmonies of the girl trios during the big band era! The barbershop just has more voices, all the way up to 6 different parts at times!

 

TruHart1 :cool:

 

At the beginning I found some of the Andrews Sisters harmonies jarring when singing the Supremes. But by the third song or so, I thought they did a better job.

 

Gman

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At the beginning I found some of the Andrews Sisters harmonies jarring when singing the Supremes. But by the third song or so, I thought they did a better job.

 

Gman

 

I agree but kudos to the Andrew's Sisters for really getting into it and having fun! Both The Supremes and the Andrews Sisters seemed to be enjoying themselves while being respectful to each others very different styles of music.

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Notice too that she references her making "Valley of the Dolls". She was cast as Helen Lawson but ended up not being able to make the picture due to her usual problems. And how ironic it was since the Neely O'hara character was based on Judy Garland's tragic downfall. I also heard that the Helen Lawson character was based on Ethel Merman. Not sure about that though.

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Notice too that she references her making "Valley of the Dolls". She was cast as Helen Lawson but ended up not being able to make the picture due to her usual problems

 

Those problems were evident behind the scene at "What's My Line?" Judy Garland arrived at the program just a few minutes before she walked out as the mystery guest. The plan was to have John Daly as both the mystery guest and the host.

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I'm not sure whether it ever occurred to me during his run on the Odd Couple-but Tony Randall was quite a good looking guy in his younger years. I, along with multiple others, wonder if he was gay.

 

Those problems were evident behind the scene at "What's My Line?" Judy Garland arrived at the program just a few minutes before she walked out as the mystery guest

Do you have a reference for that, William? I'm not doubting you. I wanted to see if there were additional interesting information about the show.

 

 

The plan was to have John Daly as both the mystery guest and the host.

 

Wasn't that the plan if any Mystery Guest didn't show up?

 

Gman

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Do you have a reference for that, William? I'm not doubting you. I wanted to see if there were additional interesting information about the show.

 

See Gil Fates' "What's My Line?: The Inside History of TV's Most Famous Panel Show."

 

Apparently the full story is that Garland arrived with two male young friends, wine and several dresses. She demanded $500 in cash before walking out on stage. In those days, that was difficult to find at the last minute on a Sunday night. She argued with one of the producers about being late. There is some disagreement about Garland's language. The clean version;"Well, I'm here now. What's the problem."

 

Bennett Cerf and Arlene Francis confirmed Fates's version at the time and later.

 

I saw Garland perform a two-hour plus concert at Boston Garden when I was a freshman in college in 1961.

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He was a mystery guest on the last show (certainly not because anyone didn't show up. A nice way to end it)...couldn't find any other time he was.

 

 

 

From my readings in the past-possibly from Wikipedia-he was always the 'go to' if the guest didn't show up.

 

Gman

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I'll defer to William on any stories about Judy Garland, but I am a big fan of What's My Line. The story Arlene Francis relates in her autobiography was this:

 

Judy was backstage in her dressing room, giving no indication that she would be ready to go on as scheduled. Terrified, she was on edge, uncooperative, and unhappy at being prodded along by show staff. Producer Mark Goodson eventually moved to the wings to fill in for her. At the last moment, Judy appeared, primed and ready to work. She approached Goodson, and he handed her the chalk she'd need to "sign in" on the blackboard during her entrance. She asked him, "How much time do I have?"; he blurted out, "Ten seconds!" And Judy looked at him calmly and said, "Well, then, what the fuck was all the rush?!"

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See Gil Fates' "What's My Line?: The Inside History of TV's Most Famous Panel Show."

 

Apparently the full story is that Garland arrived with two male young friends, wine and several dresses. She demanded $500 in cash before walking out on stage. In those days, that was difficult to find at the last minute on a Sunday night. She argued with one of the producers about being late. There is some disagreement about Garland's language. The clean version;"Well, I'm here now. What's the problem."

 

Bennett Cerf and Arlene Francis confirmed Fates's version at the time and later.

 

Unless the show was fixed, Arlene and Bennet wouldn't have been able to confirm what Garland said prior to her coming out on stage.

 

I saw Garland perform a two-hour plus concert at Boston Garden when I was a freshman in college in 1961.

 

What a great memory that must be. I have vague memories seeing the Carpenters when I was in sixth grade with my parents at the local coliseum.

 

Gman

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I'll defer to William on any stories about Judy Garland, but I am a big fan of What's My Line. The story Arlene Francis relates in her autobiography was this:

 

Judy was backstage in her dressing room, giving no indication that she would be ready to go on as scheduled. Terrified, she was on edge, uncooperative, and unhappy at being prodded along by show staff. Producer Mark Goodson eventually moved to the wings to fill in for her. At the last moment, Judy appeared, primed and ready to work. She approached Goodson, and he handed her the chalk she'd need to "sign in" on the blackboard during her entrance. She asked him, "How much time do I have?"; he blurted out, "Ten seconds!" And Judy looked at him calmly and said, "Well, then, what the fuck was all the rush?!"

 

I'm guessing this may be why she didn't know how to use the clicker for the first question.

 

Gman

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