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One Week in Tuscany


citylaw1
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Has anyone here traveled to Tuscany for a week or so? I've been to Rome a few times and Sicily, but nowhere else in Italy. Suggestions for a week in September? Should I base in Florence and one other town or city? Stay in Florence the whole time?

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Has anyone here traveled to Tuscany for a week or so? I've been to Rome a few times and Sicily, but nowhere else in Italy. Suggestions for a week in September? Should I base in Florence and one other town or city? Stay in Florence the whole time?

 

Sorry City...only Naples, Rome and the Amalfi coast for me...The Almalfi coast is a must see.

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Siena and Assisi are both worth serious time. If you are driving you might think about finding a hotel in a smaller town. Florence is a nightmare to drive in -- not that Siena and Assisi are much better, just that there is less to them.

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Will be there soon.

 

There are very few places in Italy where I haven't been. It's a favorite destination and I've been traveling there for over 25 years.

 

Tuscany and the Amalfi are very different experiences. I prefer the pools and the cuisine of Tuscany but the cliff-side/Mediterrenean scenery of the Amalfi is a must-see.

 

You need a car in Tuscany, preferably a convertible. Driving around the gorgeous winding roads and visiting numerous small towns is a key enjoyment. Even in high season, Tuscany never feels as crowded as the Amalfi, although weekend traffic can be a pain, especially near Siena. My favorite month to visit Tuscany is May/June, and I prefer basing myself in the Chianti region, because Florence is a mere 30-minute drive away (non-highway). Southern Tuscany, near Montepulciano/Pienza is also a favorite area, but it's further away from the bigger city action.

 

A car will give you the freedom to explore outlying areas around Amalfi, but I know a lot of people who never get a car when they visit, especially when they base themselves in Positano. A lot of people are afraid to drive on the coast, and for good reason.

 

September is a good month to visit the Amalfi. Many tourists have gone home and the water is still warm enough to swim. It's easy to get on a boat and visit Capri. I've stayed at Le Sirenuse and Il San Pietro many times. But these days I prefer staying in Ravello.

 

I go to Italy to relax and live la dolce vita. One week does not sound like much time to me. I wouldn't want to cram too many things into a 6-day visit, with jet lag, unless that's your idea of fun.

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There are very few places in Italy where I haven't been. It's a favorite destination and I've been traveling there for over 25 years.

 

Tuscany and the Amalfi are very different experiences. I prefer the pools and the cuisine of Tuscany but the cliff-side/Mediterrenean scenery of the Amalfi is a must-see.

 

You need a car in Tuscany, preferably a convertible. Driving around the gorgeous winding roads and visiting numerous small towns is a key enjoyment. Even in high season, Tuscany never feels as crowded as the Amalfi, although weekend traffic can be a pain, especially near Siena. My favorite month to visit Tuscany is May/June, and I prefer basing myself in the Chianti region, because Florence is a mere 30-minute drive away (non-highway). Southern Tuscany, near Montepulciano/Pienza is also a favorite area, but it's further away from the bigger city action.

 

A car will give you the freedom to explore outlying areas around Amalfi, but I know a lot of people who never get a car when they visit, especially when they base themselves in Positano. A lot of people are afraid to drive on the coast, and for good reason.

 

September is a good month to visit the Amalfi. Many tourists have gone home and the water is still warm enough to swim. It's easy to get on a boat and visit Capri. I've stayed at Le Sirenuse and Il San Pietro many times. But these days I prefer staying in Ravello.

 

I go to Italy to relax and live la dolce vita. One week does not sound like much time to me. I wouldn't want to cram too many things into a 6-day visit, with jet lag, unless that's your idea of fun.

 

I'm leaning toward 7-10 full days in Tuscany. What would you recommend, maybe 2 bases?

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Sounds great to spend time in Tuscany. A week is probably not enough but it is better than nothing. Definitely a few days in Florence but you must get out into the countryside. I spent 2 weeks camping in Tuscany a few weeks ago. Definitely visit a few of the hill towns - I especially liked Volterra -- a beautiful walled town on top of a massive hill with 360 degree views. Also visit the famous town with all the towers - San Gimignano.

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I'm leaning toward 7-10 full days in Tuscany. What would you recommend' date=' maybe 2 bases?[/quote']

 

It depends on how much art you want to see in Florence. If you are interested in just the highlights three days are fine, although it's a shame to see so little of one of Europe's most interesting cities.

 

I agree that the Chianti region is a good base from which to explore Tuscany, but you will need a car. My suggestion is to realize that you can not see everything, so schedule lunches at vinyards before you leave the U.S. But small towns are just as nice, with good restaurants.

 

I posted because I prefer Nothern and Eastern Europe to Italy...I wanted you to have a slightly different view.

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One of my most memorable travel experiences in 2010 took me to Tuscany and the Amalfi Coast. There was nothing that I disliked about this superb tour which took us to Positano, Capri, Villa Capri, the Amalfi Coast [which I loved because of its rival Carmel Coast 1 [from Monterey to Big Sur and south] which is in my area] Siena, Assisi, and other towns which I can't remember.

 

Others here have given you some great points. If you can take in some of the smaller Tuscan towns and the Amalfi Coast. In terms of where you should be based, I can't suggest!

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I was in Italy for several weeks in late Spring. I spent a week in Florence and stayed at The Hermitage Hotel per RockHard 's advice. I had an excellent adventure and enjoyed staying at just one hotel in each city. It was very easy to book day trips using trains and buses. I simply cannot drive in Italy and the only time I seriously tried, I ended up going back to the rental company and hiring a driver, and that was when I was young and could enjoy an adrenaline rush. There are all kinds of guided day trips and guidebooks so you can do a day trip on your own, even IPhone apps. The staff at the hotel were able to help me make arrangements, but I did have a fairly good idea of what I wanted to do. I took some classes in cooking, went to some lectures at the museums, some local opera, and just enjoyed walking about. Some people like taking apartments, but I enjoy a comfortable hotel. I still wander about in the markets and pick up snacks and picnic food. I have no particular airline loyalty and flew on Lufthansa. I was very comfortable in a coach seat with my own neck roll and blanket, plus I had downloaded several novels and operas to keep me occupied. If you're by yourself, you should be careful to book a single in a "double" room because a single room is generally just too small for more than one night. I got the best deals by using the hotel websites and having an Italian friend call directly. Booking.com, TripAdvisor, Frommers, Rick Steves and this site were all helpful in picking hotels and things to do, plus Hipchipmunk to figure out the best airline for me.

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I was in Italy for several weeks in late Spring. I spent a week in Florence and stayed at The Hermitage Hotel per RockHard 's advice. I had an excellent adventure and enjoyed staying at just one hotel in each city. It was very easy to book day trips using trains and buses. I simply cannot drive in Italy and the only time I seriously tried, I ended up going back to the rental company and hiring a driver, and that was when I was young and could enjoy an adrenaline rush. There are all kinds of guided day trips and guidebooks so you can do a day trip on your own, even IPhone apps. The staff at the hotel were able to help me make arrangements, but I did have a fairly good idea of what I wanted to do. I took some classes in cooking, went to some lectures at the museums, some local opera, and just enjoyed walking about. Some people like taking apartments, but I enjoy a comfortable hotel. I still wander about in the markets and pick up snacks and picnic food. I have no particular airline loyalty and flew on Lufthansa. I was very comfortable in a coach seat with my own neck roll and blanket, plus I had downloaded several novels and operas to keep me occupied. If you're by yourself, you should be careful to book a single in a "double" room because a single room is generally just too small for more than one night. I got the best deals by using the hotel websites and having an Italian friend call directly. Booking.com, TripAdvisor, Frommers, Rick Steves and this site were all helpful in picking hotels and things to do, plus Hipchipmunk to figure out the best airline for me.

 

I'm thinking Florence and Siena? Day trips from each?

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Now you are talking!!!! I absolutely love Tuscany. If you are an Italian Renaissance art and architecture fan Florence and Venice should be your two main destinations. Line is the single most important element in Florentine Renaissance art and architecture while color plays the lead role in Venice. If you have never been to Florence you could easily spend 7 to 10 days there and not see everything.

 

A couple of years ago I rented a car and spent three wonderful weeks driving, over a thousand miles, to various destinations in Tuscany. Siena is to medieval art and architecture what Florence is to Renaissance art and architecture. Siena is full of day trippers and thus takes on a very different feeling in the morning and late afternoon and evening. The Palazzo Ravizza is a wonderful hotel very near the city center and has its own on-site parking. Siena makes a great base from which to visit the various hill towns of the Chianti region. Sansepolcro, Montepulciano, Pienza and Montalcino are all within easy driving distance of Siena.

 

Frankly with the amount of time you have I would recommend spending two or three days in Florence. Then rent a car and base yourself in Sienna for the remaining days in Sienna. Save Umbria with Assisi and Perugia for another trip.

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Now you are talking!!!! I absolutely love Tuscany. If you are an Italian Renaissance art and architecture fan Florence and Venice should be your two main destinations. Line is the single most important element in Florentine Renaissance art and architecture while color plays the lead role in Venice. If you have never been to Florence you could easily spend 7 to 10 days there and not see everything.

 

A couple of years ago I rented a car and spent three wonderful weeks driving, over a thousand miles, to various destinations in Tuscany. Siena is to medieval art and architecture what Florence is to Renaissance art and architecture. Siena is full of day trippers and thus takes on a very different feeling in the morning and late afternoon and evening. The Palazzo Ravizza is a wonderful hotel very near the city center and has its own on-site parking. Siena makes a great base from which to visit the various hill towns of the Chianti region. Sansepolcro, Montepulciano, Pienza and Montalcino are all within easy driving distance of Siena.

 

Frankly with the amount of time you have I would recommend spending two or three days in Florence. Then rent a car and base yourself in Sienna for the remaining days in Sienna. Save Umbria with Assisi and Perugia for another trip.

 

Sounds like what I'll do.

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You also might check out Gaydar and some of the European Gay guides, as in Italy there are several companions that do double duty... tours during the day to places that the natives like as well as the tourists, and they will provide companionship at night or arrange for companions to your specifications.... enjoy the trip... wish I were going with you!

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I had a marvelous picture in front of the Butcher's sho in Panzano. I couldn't post it beause it had an engraving that said On this date, Florentine Steak died. Panzano is a great center if you don't mind driving.

 

My last two extended trips in Italy were with Alexio "alexioescort". Although he is based in Rome, he knows most of Italy and can travel to any part. I know he has spent time throughout Tuscany. His rates are so reasonable it only makes sense to hire him by the week. For Rome, he has a great car that he would probably take you in, also his motorcycle. But I have rented cars and put him on as a driver.

He is an excellent driver and wise in the ways of driving in Italy. Highly recommended as a companion, driver, escort. (Of course tastes vary, and in Rome, he could be hired as a guide to help you find your 'taste'.

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Spend 4 nights in florence and 3 nights in sienna. Drive slowly from florence to tuscany and see the countryside enroute. Definately go and see the famous butcher in the world in panzano, dario cechinni.

 

I booked 4 in Florence and 4 in Siena. Early September. Now I need a 25 year old twink to accompany me.

 

I'm flying first class, but I don't want to pay that much for the escort. Is that rude?

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I'm flying first class, but I don't want to pay that much for the escort. Is that rude?

 

Is this a trick question? http://www.maleescortreview.com/forum/public/style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif

 

Kidding aside, if you're extra kind to him, he may be extra kind to you. And that would make for a happier trip, no?

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I booked 4 in Florence and 4 in Siena. Early September. Now I need a 25 year old twink to accompany me.

 

I'm flying first class, but I don't want to pay that much for the escort. Is that rude?

 

It's not rude if you get an Italian escort. He does not have to fly to Tuscany and he speaks the language.

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Is this a trick question? http://www.maleescortreview.com/forum/public/style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif

 

Kidding aside, if you're extra kind to him, he may be extra kind to you. And that would make for a happier trip, no?

 

It's $4800.

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It's $4800.

 

Then why not sit with him in coach? Or ask him if he'd prefer first class or an extra $2400 in cash?

 

I took your question at face value: Is it rude to fly first class and put the escort in steerage? I can only speak for myself but, yes, that would create the impression that one of you is worth more than the other. If not rude, it would seem to border on insensitive.

 

Not suggesting you take my advice, of course. Just attempting to provide the requested feedback.

 

No charge, and please feel free to ignore it!

 

http://www.accountingweb.co.uk/sites/default/files/siftmedia-accountingweb/u176764/2011-04-29_095644_smiley_fingers_in_ears.gif

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The idea of finding an Italian companion is really a very good one. Milan being, one of the world's major clothing design centers is chuck full of drop dead gorgeous male runway models. Some (many) of these guys escort on side to pay the rent. Milan is a very short train ride to Florence. Check out the Milan ads on gaydar and some of the other European escort sites. Some of the guys even advertise on Rentboy. In fact right now there are 17 guys from Milan posting ads on rentboy.

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I realize that this thread has evolved and seems to be centering on hiring an escort/driver for getting around. However, I would like to go back, if you allow me, to the question of Tuscany vs or including the Amalfi Coast. Now Rock Hard has certainly recommended the absolute top of accommodation in Positanop on the Amalfi Coast. I love the Amalfi Coast, but certainly can't afford the two places he stays at, and they really are, the absolute best! When I was much younger, I stayed just next door to Le Sirineuse at a place called L'Ancora, very inexpensive, included breakfast and supper overlooking the water. We could catch peeks of the beautiful people around the pool next door. Now, I can afford a little better and I stay at at place called the Poseidon. Much less expensive, but very nice and higher up. Great views etc. Now, its been a few years since I was there, but it is worth a look. Just suggesting these two places as cheaper alternatives to the most fantastic places suggest by Rock Hard. Easy trips to both Capri and Ischia (twice as big, half the population, don't miss out on a visit to the Thermas Baths).

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