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John Kerry's Words Nov 3, 2004


HooBoy
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But in an American election, there are no losers, because whether or not our candidates are successful, the next morning we all wake up as Americans. And that -- that is the greatest privilege and the most remarkable good fortune that can come to us on earth.

 

With that gift also comes obligation. We are required now to work together for the good of our country. In the days ahead, we must find common cause. We must join in common effort without remorse or recrimination, without anger or rancor. America is in need of unity and longing for a larger measure of compassion.

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Kerry's words were eloquent, but I think they amount to whistling in the wind. The new administration isn't remotely interested in building bridges or uniting the nation. They had the chance (and the obligation) to try to do that in 2000, when George Bush lost the popular vote and was imposed on a shocked and divided nation by one of the most questionable Supreme Court decisions of all time. The record is clear that the Republicans didn't take the opportunity to try to govern from the center and continue the middle-of-the-road policies of the previous administration, which is what the majority of Americans voted for in 2000.

 

With a thumping majority, even greater control of Congress and the courts, and visions of mandate dancing in their heads, the Republicans will be even more extreme than they were during the past 4 years. After all, there are no brakes on them now, whatsoever. Bush will give another platitudinous inaugural address trying to lull Americans into continuing to believe that he's a compassionate conservative everyone should support for the good of the country, but there is NOTHING in the Republicans' stated agenda that's either compassionate OR conservative, in the common meaning of the words.

 

Bad times are upon us, friends. Before this is over, even the Dougies and Kippies and Merlins and FFFs of the world will be sorry they lived to see this day.

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This is what I want for ALL of the people in this Message Center:

 

We must join in common effort without remorse or recrimination, without anger or rancor. America is in need of unity and longing for a larger measure of compassion.

 

I hope we can all take a deep breath and become positive about what we as Americans can accomplish.

 

The people spoke.

 

Now deal with it, without anger or rancor, please. You can still affect change.

 

HooBoy

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Welcome to the dark ages! Where do we go from here -- It's even WORSE than we thought. Apparently the winning team has "moral values" meaning anti-abortion and anti-gays, pro-capital punishment, and who cares about human rights abuses at Abu Ghraib or the over 100,000 civilian casualties in Iraq, in addition our 1000 dead US soldiers who died for Georgie's fine adventure. Here's to corporate pillage, government secrecy, low taxes for the wealthiest 1% and record deficits. Here's to a faith-based foreign policy (a.k.a. the Crusades) and a faith-based economy a.k.a. Wishful Thinking -- what $400 trillion deficit?

 

And so we "stay the course", and head straight for the cliff. Osama Bin Laden claims he'll win by simply bankrupting us, and still we march on undeterred by common sense or sanity.

 

This morning I went to Starbucks and asked for a latte "with arsenic", black humor being better than none at all, and the girl looks at me and says "what's arsenic?"

 

My sympathies to us all.

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RE: Hoo Do We Trust Now?

 

Oh, Hoo, be realistic. After a long hard battle you don't really expect us to roll over like some street trick and head for the door, do you? Soon enough the Ashcrofts will be telling us what to think, so don't you think you could hold off a little on trying to dictate how your loyal board members respond to this very disappointing news?

 

I thought not. Okay, I will re-register as a Republican and try my best to screw gays. Happy now?:)

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Fine words, Hooboy, but I wonder if there is really any common ground possible with the Bushies, especially for gays.

Bush is imbued with the fundamentalist beliefs of the evangelical Christian movement. Truth is absolute for them, not a thing to be reasonably discussed, pondered or searched for. Social justice is not of interest to them except to the extent it is specifically written in various ancient scriptures, what we call the Bible.

So for well-educated, reasonable people, dialogue with the Christian right is impossible. They are the American equivalents of the Muslim fundamentalists in the Middle East. They may not use the same methods to terrorize opponents, but the mentality is the same. "We are right and we know it because God says so." They have special credentials with God.

For them we are sinners and unredeemable. In times gone by the word was heretics, but that sounds too medieval. But in fact that's just what their religious ideas are, medieval (although not so advanced as Aquinas or Teresa of Avila or many others who are intellectually far superior to the rather puny minds of the American evangelicals).

No, Bush and his cohorts have no interest or need to find any common ground with us. It's just rhetoric. We're on our own.

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It's an admirable and graceful concession speech, and I offer my sincere congratulations to all the people on this board who hoped to see Bush gain another four years. Your efforts have been rewarded, and America has been bestowed the administration it deserves.

There are those of us who feel somewhat differently - apparently we are just a little less than half the population- about how this country should be run, and of course we are not going to just disappear now that we have lost this battle. We often wonder just how bad does it have to get before Mr. & Mrs. Middle America (literally) will see the need for change. Much, much worse, I guess.

 

Personally, gay rights issues are the least of my concerns for the future. Gay people have weathered centuries of hostility, and we will weather the next four years well enough. I am more concerned about the lives being lost in Iraq (and other nations coming to a theatre of war near you soon, I imagine)

the dismantling of the social security system and the Enviromental protection Agency, and the nation's growing debt.

These are the things that will be the proving grounds over the next four years for every american.

 

 

Trix

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Guest coololdguy

I personally take little comfort in John Kerry's call for unity. In the last couple of days I have heard several political pundits from both the right and left, suggest that the gay issue was the motivating factor in the huge turnout of the evangelical right and in fact it may have been the issue that re-elected this president. I do not know if it is true but I do find the possibility daunting and personally depressing.

On the other hand I am from Illinois where Barack Obama slaughtered the homophobe of all homophobes, Alan Keyes. It was the largest state wide win of any candidate in Illinois political history. I am not reading anything into this victory that isn't there but Keyes did storm this state with his anti-gay rhetoric and I am claiming his huge rejection as a small victory and I will cling to it because it is all I have.

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While a call to national unity may seem like something worthwhile, the cold hard reality is that the victors in this election could care less about it. The Republican notion of national unity is for everyone to jump on their bandwagon and do what they want. Compromise is not a word in their vocabulary. You don't have to take my word for it, here's what Bush said yesterday:

 

"I earned capital in the campaign, political capital, and now I intend to spend it," Bush said a day after a decisive victory that made him the first president in 68 years to win re-election and gain seats in both the House and Senate.

 

"I'll reach out to everyone who shares our goals," said Bush, who 24 hours earlier had promised to try to win over those who voted for his Democratic opponent."

 

In other words, if you don't share their goals, you're shit out of luck.

 

I have no intention of supporting the goals of Bush and his cryptofascist band of fanatics. I won't take my marching orders from a war criminal. Get ready for a scorched earth approach to government. After Nixon resigned, it was hard to find anyone who voted for him. Today, Nixon and his crowd look like choirboys in comparison to the Bush Mafia. In 2008, I'll bet it will be hard to find anyone who voted for Dubya. 51% of the voters will suddenly have another episode of amnesia, but the other 48% will remember precisely why they voted against Bush.

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>"I earned capital in the campaign, political capital, and now

>I intend to spend it," Bush said a day after a decisive

>victory that made him the first president in 68 years to win

>re-election and gain seats in both the House and Senate.

 

Those aren't his words, of course. He is just echoing what Cheney said when he told Greenspan and O'Neil to fuck off, after the 2002 election, when they suggested that additional tax cuts would bankrupt the country (even before the cost of an Iraqi war was factored in).

 

>After Nixon resigned, it was hard to

>find anyone who voted for him. Today, Nixon and his crowd

>look like choirboys in comparison to the Bush Mafia.

 

I was just thinking today that we have not had a very good track record on choosing Presidents, or losing candidates, since at least 1960. But the greater the margin of victory, the harder we come down on them. LBJ was afraid to run for reelection. Nixon quit before he was fired. Clinton wallowed in scandal for his last two years. Same thing will happen to Bush. We can't impeach someone for stupidity, but in two years the country will see right through him.

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Having an even bigger majority in the Senate and House isn't

enough for Bush; he said he'd also like a line item veto.

With that, he wouldn't even have to talk to a Democrat again.

 

 

> We are required now to

>work together for the good of our country. In the days ahead,

>we must find common cause. We must join in common effort

>without remorse or recrimination, without anger or rancor.

>America is in need of unity and longing for a larger measure

>of compassion.

 

Why don't you say that in a letter to George Bush. He'll be real

receptive to your telling him what he needs to do, won't he.

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