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Will Bush Ever Speak English as well as Karzai?


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Watching the joint Rose Garden "press availability" of Bush and Karzai this morning -- and Bush's little tirade about just asking one question in the 100 degree heat -- I am once again embarrassed that the president of Afghanistan can speak English better than the president of the United States.

 

And without a script prepared by someone else.

 

Do you think people are afraid to tell Bush that there are only two syllables in "remnants" ?

 

I also hear a slight brogue in Karzai's speech. He was educated in India, but I wonder if some of his instructors came from Scotland.

 

Bush made his standard little campaign speech to the assembled reporters, who have heard it many times before. The question of the day seemed to be when Saddam Hussein will be handed over to the new Iraqi "government," which of course has no control over the country and which was appointed by a group of people appointed by the Americans. Will the October surprise be the capture of bin Laden, or the escape of Saddam Hussein?

 

At one point, answering a question about Iraq, Bush said that we're over there to help the Afghan people. But he corrected himself.

 

Asked about Ron Reagan's comment about politicians who wear their religion on their sleeve, Bush said he's always been cautious about people who tell you that you have a speck in your eye, when they have a log in their own. I don't think anyone understood where he was going with that.

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Guest rohale

In a way I disagree. Just imagine how many speeches a President has to make in a given week. Imagine just how much time it takes to prepare a speech. Imagine how much time it takes for a president to memorise any given speech. George W. Bush does not have the easiest job in the world. He is on television twenty four hours a day worldwide. Does Mr Bush suffer from a slip of the tongue in his Rose Garden speeches. The answer is yes, but you know what he's only human. He makes mistakes and probably one too many. Does that make him a bad person. For some the answer is yes and for some the answer is no.

 

President Muhammed Karzai has an impressive vocabulary of the English language. One could make the easy comparison of Mr Karzai to say Prime Minister Tony Blair. On the world stage Mr Blair has great depth. In his home country Former Foreign Secretary Robin Cook can ennunciate words better than Mr Blair. Does that make Mr Blair an idiot, not by a long shot. On the other hand, Mr Blair can lay waste to Mr Karzai. I've seen joint press conferences that Mr Karzai has done outside #10 Downing Street with the Prime Minister. I've seen Mr Karzai give joint press conferences with former Prime Minister Jean Crittean of Canada. He pales in comparison to both persons.

 

I watched the unveiling of former President Clinton and Mrs Clinton's potraits at the White House earlier this evening on BBC America. Mr Bush gave a very eloquent speech to the assembled East Wing room of the White House. Most were former Clinton Administration staffers. He sounded pretty good to me. Every person has there good and bad days. Just last week I had to give six presentations at work. My voice became parched. By the time the weekend rolled around, my voice was so dry that I was stuttering. I had a hard time communicating. It certainly didn't help that I had very little sleep in the weekdays leading up to the weekend. These things are natural and President Bush has the same problem as most people do. No one on this planet is in 100% control of their faculties all the time. He made a mistake, so what is it the end of the world?

 

On a side note the Bush Administration are going to hold onto Saddam indefinitely before handing him over to the new Iraqi government. As for the October suprise, it just started with gasoline prices started to come down nationwide. This is my piece and I'm sticking to it.

 

Rohale

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>I watched the unveiling of former President Clinton and Mrs

>Clinton's potraits at the White House earlier this evening on

>BBC America. Mr Bush gave a very eloquent speech to the

>assembled East Wing room of the White House. Most were former

>Clinton Administration staffers. He sounded pretty good to

>me.

 

I also heard this speech, and felt it was one of the better ones Bush has given. That said, I don't believe for one second that he wrote it. Any speech that is planned or scheduled is written by speech writers for maximum effect. As long as one has the ability to read a teleprompter, it is possible to deliver a good speech, if the speech writer wrote a good speech. Dubya's limitations become apparent when he is unscripted. His press conferences and interviews (like the recent one with Tim Russert) clearly show how he is limited to parroting his memorized collection of trite statements like "This is a war", and "I'm a war president" and "Stay the course". Not much original thought going on inside that head.

 

>On a side note the Bush Administration are going to hold onto

>Saddam indefinitely before handing him over to the new Iraqi

>government. As for the October suprise, it just started with

>gasoline prices started to come down nationwide. This is my

>piece and I'm sticking to it.

>

 

Holding onto Saddam is just further evidence that the notion of the U.S. government granting true sovereignty to the new Iraqi government is a sham. As is customary with Dubya and his administration, they're more than happy to pass responsibility for the mess they've created to the new government on a timetable designed around Bush's election campaign, and not on the basis of what is really in the best interests of a new Iraq. Dubya is most likely scared shitless that Saddam might manage to escape, so he's not ready to take the chance on that, which would further bolster the argument that the new government in Baghdad is not ready for prime time.

 

On the gasoline issue, there is still considerable volatility in world markets, so if the prices come down too much or too fast, you can bet it's probably a deal worked out with the oil companies to give the public a respite so Bush can get his poll numbers up.

 

I'm looking forward to Michael Moore's "June 25th Surprise". If the public will see Fahrenheit 911, and all of Bush's incompetence and sleaze, then his "October Surprise" might just be too little, too late.

>

>

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> Imagine how much time it

>takes for a president to memorise any given speech.

 

That's why they have teleprompters. Actually, in the Rose Garden, he was just reading from notes at the podium.

 

 

>Bush does not have the easiest job in the world. He is on

>television twenty four hours a day worldwide.

 

Did you read that first, to check how ridiculous it sounds? He is on television only when he wants to be, in carefully selected environments. Lately he's been hanging out at military bases, the last bastion of true communism in the western world. (They take care of you from cradle to grave, and all you need to do is turn out and salute when the Supreme Leader shows up.) Today that's what he is doing in Florida, tax-free home of many of our military voters.

 

>Does Mr Bush

>suffer from a slip of the tongue in his Rose Garden speeches.

>The answer is yes, but you know what he's only human. He

>makes mistakes and probably one too many. Does that make him

 

>On the other hand, Mr Blair can lay waste to Mr Karzai. I've

>seen joint press conferences that Mr Karzai has done outside

>#10 Downing Street with the Prime Minister. I've seen Mr

>Karzai give joint press conferences with former Prime Minister

>Jean Crittean of Canada. He pales in comparison to both

>persons.

 

Compare Blair's performance during question time in Parliament (where he has been briefed on the questions, but generally speaks without referring to notes) with Bush's monotonous mouthing of platitudes punctuated with uh's. My point wasn't that Karzai is brilliant, in a second language -- it's just that Bush is illiterate, in his mother tongue.

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Guest rohale

>>Bush does not have the easiest job in the world. He is on

>>television twenty four hours a day worldwide.

>

>Did you read that first, to check how ridiculous it sounds?

>He is on television only when he wants to be, in carefully

>selected environments.

 

Actually I did read that first part very carefully. He is on television when he wants to be but in an age of satelite technology when a sitting president gives a speech, because of the different time zones that we live in worldwide. Somewhere on this planet the President's speech is being broadcast on a televison network and someone out there is is paying attention. If the person is not paying attention the speech means nothing. If the person is then an opinion might be formulated. This goes on twenty four hours a day for the world to see.

 

 

 

>Compare Blair's performance during question time in Parliament

>(where he has been briefed on the questions, but generally

>speaks without referring to notes) with Bush's monotonous

>mouthing of platitudes punctuated with uh's. My point wasn't

>that Karzai is brilliant, in a second language -- it's just

>that Bush is illiterate, in his mother tongue.

 

 

Actually the Prime Minister never gets briefed in advance to the questions. The reason being is that he does not know how many MP's will be asking questions. We're not just talking about the Tory members asking questions or backbenchers asking questions but members of Mr Blair's own political have a right to ask questions and in recent times many have. John Prescott who is the deputy prime minister once told a British talk show host Michael Parkinson that is impossible for a sitting leader not to have a briefing book where he can refer to for additional notes to a point that the leader might be trying to make. As for Mr Bush being illiterate, the last time I checked in order to graduate from college, you have to take an English Literature class and pass. I believe Mr Bush graduated from Yale and can still speak English without a problem. He's still literate in his mother tongue. He may add in uh's but then there are quite a lot of people who do speak like that. We walk amongst them everyday without even realising.

 

Rohale

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>Actually I did read that first part very carefully. He is on

>television when he wants to be but in an age of satelite

>technology when a sitting president gives a speech, because of

>the different time zones that we live in worldwide. Somewhere

>on this planet the President's speech is being broadcast on a

>televison network and someone out there is is paying

>attention.

 

I'm just sorry I'm missing all those 2 a.m. speeches he makes for the benefit of viewers in Tokyo and Moscow. I had no idea that he kept such irregular hours.

 

>Actually the Prime Minister never gets briefed in advance to

>the questions. The reason being is that he does not know how

>many MP's will be asking questions. We're not just talking

>about the Tory members asking questions or backbenchers asking

>questions but members of Mr Blair's own political have a right

>to ask questions and in recent times many have.

 

It's naive to assume that his media staff can't anticipate questions and doesn't brief him on the answers. Bush's people spend hours on it before press conferences. For Blair, it may not be possible to guess how many questions are asked, but the time is limited to half an hour. And as the BBC website explains:

 

Government backbenchers can normally be relied upon to ask a `helpful' question which will allow the prime minister to tell the House about successful government policies.

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/a-z_of_parliament/p-q/82556.stm

 

 

>As for Mr Bush being illiterate, the last time I

>checked in order to graduate from college, you have to take an

>English Literature class and pass. I believe Mr Bush

>graduated from Yale and can still speak English without a

>problem.

 

Bush got in through a legacy admission, and got out with a "gentleman's C" average. If colleges started flunking out rich kids, there wouldn't be enough scholarship money around for the bright kids like Kerry.

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Guest rohale

>I'm just sorry I'm missing all those 2 a.m. speeches he makes

>for the benefit of viewers in Tokyo and Moscow. I had no idea

>that he kept such irregular hours.

 

Apparently I heard that Mr Bush likes to go bed early. It's been reported my the media that Mr and Mrs Bush usually turn in around 9p.m. So much for the irregular hours. Now as for those 2a.m speeches, here is the big suprise of them all. Whenever the President makes a speech, due to the vast abundance of technology, his speech is being broadcast via satelite feed and most television networks worldwide tape the speech. It's up to each individual television station to decide how much or which portions will be aired. Obviously the speech in Tokyo is being transalated into Japanese. In Moscow the speech is being translated into Russian so that the local viewers can see the President speak but hear it in their respective mother tongues. Now that's incredible.

 

>It's naive to assume that his media staff can't anticipate

>questions and doesn't brief him on the answers. Bush's people

>spend hours on it before press conferences. For Blair, it may

>not be possible to guess how many questions are asked, but the

>time is limited to half an hour. And as the BBC website

>explains:

>

>Government backbenchers can normally be relied upon to ask a

>`helpful' question which will allow the prime minister to tell

>the House about successful government policies.

>

>http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/a-z_of_parliament/p-

 

Prime Minister Tony Blair has a reputation of going over the time limit which is to the benefit of the MP's. Now you qouted a source sing the BBC official news website. I too check out the site at least once in two weeks and they have a great section called BBC talking points. You however missed one valuable point to the article. The leader of the opposition is Michael Howard and he gets up to six interventions to cut the Prime Minister off. However Mr Blair still takes questions from Mr Howard. Afer all Mr Howard's job is not to congratulate the PM on a job well done. Michael Howard wants Tony Blair's job, so he asks tough questions and a lot of times Mr Blair has a hard time answering them. In the article they mention another political party the Liberal Democrats. Their respective leader is Charles Kennedy and he's allowed two questions. His political party will never get into power because they have minority seats in The House Of Commons. Besides the last time they were in power were in the early 1900's when Lloyd George was their leader. Now Mr Kennedy also asks tough questions to Mr Blair. Once upon a time Mr Blair was once the leader of the opposition to former Prime Minister John Majors ( 1990-1997 ). There is a succession cycle that has carried on and on until Britain can no longer sustain a democracy. I hope that day never comes, in the mean time we can expect the Labour MP's to ask nice questions except when the issues deal with Iraq and more importantly labor union rights. As for the Conservatives they will try to humiliate the Labour Government so that by the next general election which ever political party wins the most seats their leader enters or stays in #10 Downing Street. All this takes place every Wednesday for thirty minutes so that 60 million Britons get to decide which leader and political party they like the most. Let me give you an example. Towns like Kingston or New Malden are part of the Royal Burrough of Kingston Upon Thames or a town like Teddington and Hanworth are part of the London Burough of Hounslow. Ealing and Southall are part of the London Burough Of Ealing. Or Malden Manor which is part of the London Burough of Merton. All these towns that I just mentioned are part of Buroughs throughout the British Isles and they have elected MP's. For example Kingston used to represented by Norman Lamont who was John Major's foreign secretary, his job was to defend the then Tory Government's policies against former Labour Leader Neil Kinnock ( 1983-1992) and former Shadow Foreign Secretary Gerald Koffman. These two respective gentlemens job were to question the government's position through the twice weekly session of Question Time with the PM. Many years ago every thursday night some MP's would go on a local program hosted by Sir Robin Day and since most people work in the day, this was the viewers chance to watch a demcratic debate in action. The Question and Session debate with the Prime Minister had been going on since the days of Oliver Kromwell who was around at the beheading of King Charles I and stripped his son of most monarchs powers thus giving more power to the people through Parliament. That's what British Democracy has always been about " Power To The People".

 

>Bush got in through a legacy admission, and got out with a

>"gentleman's C" average. If colleges started flunking out

>rich kids, there wouldn't be enough scholarship money around

>for the bright kids like Kerry.

 

Rohale

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Guest rohale

>Bush got in through a legacy admission, and got out with a

>"gentleman's C" average. If colleges started flunking out

>rich kids, there wouldn't be enough scholarship money around

>for the bright kids like Kerry.

 

 

You're quite right but still an average " C " is considered passing. I wen't to college and I got much better grades than Mr Bush and yet look where he is today compared to most people. He has great wealth, he will never live in poverty. It doesn't matter how he got his wealth or how he attained the position that he has today. The bottom line is he is top of the ladder of success and no one can take it away from him. That's the bottom line. Some people are born lucky and others are not. Mr Bush happens to be one of the lucky ones.

 

Rohale

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>You're quite right but still an average " C " is considered

>passing. I wen't to college and I got much better grades than

>Mr Bush and yet look where he is today compared to most

>people. He has great wealth, he will never live in poverty.

>It doesn't matter how he got his wealth or how he attained the

>position that he has today. The bottom line is he is top of

>the ladder of success and no one can take it away from him.

>That's the bottom line. Some people are born lucky and others

>are not. Mr Bush happens to be one of the lucky ones.

 

Luck had nothing to do with it. Mr. Bush was born in to a family of great wealth, power and priviledge. In that way, I suppose he is in possession of more luck than someone born in to abject poverty. But, do not discount the family and old school ties at work here.

 

--EBG

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> All

>this takes place every Wednesday for thirty minutes so that 60

>million Britons get to decide which leader and political party

>they like the most.

 

The regularity and predictability of that time slot is under review because it makes an easy target for terrorists (although the IRA never seemed to take advantage of it, the Irish are notoriously not as smart as the Arabs).

 

>Many years ago every

>thursday night some MP's would go on a local program hosted by

>Sir Robin Day and since most people work in the day, this was

>the viewers chance to watch a demcratic debate in action.

 

This must have been before the invention of videotape, so that the Prime Minister could not appear on television 24 hours a day.

 

>The

>Question and Session debate with the Prime Minister had been

>going on since the days of Oliver Kromwell who was around at

>the beheading of King Charles I and stripped his son of most

>monarchs powers thus giving more power to the people through

>Parliament.

 

It's Cromwell, but as Bush proves, you can get through college without learning how to spell (or spell-check). It's interesting that English monarchs beginning with Charles II (grandson of the notorious fag James I) were such powerless figureheads, because on this side of the Atlantic we're about to have our annual celebration of the Declaration of Independence, a list of grievances not against Parliament but against George III.

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>At one point, answering a question about Iraq, Bush said that

>we're over there to help the Afghan people. But he corrected

>himself.

 

I heard that too. (I make it a point always to grab the remote as soon as Bush flashes his beady little eyes on my TV screen, but I did hear that comment he made...)

 

I think Bush really does think that Afghanistan and Iraq are the same country. And even if he doesn't, I think he's so managed to convince himself of his own propaganda that Saddam is linked with 9/11, that he simply doesn't know the difference between his lies and the truth anymore.

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Guest rohale

>

>The regularity and predictability of that time slot is under

>review because it makes an easy target for terrorists

>(although the IRA never seemed to take advantage of it, the

>Irish are notoriously not as smart as the Arabs).

 

Actually the IRA are a lot more smarter in recent years. Gerry Adams who represents Sinn Fein the political wing of the Irish Republican Army realised that killing British soldiers won't solve the problem of either a unified Ireland or a separate Northern Ireland where Britain no longer controls influence. In other words Gerry Adams wants to carry out the " Good Friday Accords ". The problem is David Trimble is no longer in a positon to negotiate with the IRA as his political party has suffered enough setbacks in local coucil in Londonderry and Belfast. He appears weak and then there is the Reverand Ian Paisley, the notorious war monger who hates the catholics and makes it clear that he will never negotiate with a terrorist organization like the IRA. Still Prime Minister Tony Blair believes that he can get some sort of agreement between the Ulster Unionists and the Catholic Loyalists. Only time will tell if Mr Blair can resurrect another failed peace plan.

>>Many years ago every

>>thursday night some MP's would go on a local program hosted

>by

>>Sir Robin Day and since most people work in the day, this

>was

>>the viewers chance to watch a demcratic debate in action.

>

>This must have been before the invention of videotape, so that

>the Prime Minister could not appear on television 24 hours a

 

 

Actually Sir Robin Day's show has always been taped since the program first aired in the early 1970's. As for the PM being on television being on television 24 hours a day. As Bush has proven, you don't have to be well minded to have opinions nowadays.

 

 

It's

>interesting that English monarchs beginning with Charles II

>(grandson of the notorious fag James I) were such powerless

>figureheads, because on this side of the Atlantic we're about

>to have our annual celebration of the Declaration of

>Independence, a list of grievances not against Parliament but

>against George III

 

The interesting aspect about King George III is after the Declaration

Of Independence. He completely lost his senses and tried signing away the rest of the British colonies at that time. Parliament wouldn't have this and they tried to encourage his son to prove that his father was not fit to be the king. He also had a grudge against hi father because his parents did not approve of the woman he wanted to marry. Many palace officials became alarmed at the thought of the corrupt son ruling, that they did everything in their powers to bring George III back into his senses. At the end it worked and the hatred between father and son was put on the back burner.

In fact I believe there was film version done in 1994 titled " The Madness of King George" and starred Sir Nigel Hawthorne and Helen Mirren. In fact Sir Nigel was nominated for an oscar but lost out to Tom Hanks for " Forrest Gump ". A friend recently told me that she had seen it and liked it.

 

Rohale

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>In fact I believe there was film version done in 1994 titled "

>The Madness of King George" and starred Sir Nigel Hawthorne

>and Helen Mirren. In fact Sir Nigel was nominated for an

>oscar but lost out to Tom Hanks for " Forrest Gump ". A

>friend recently told me that she had seen it and liked it.

>

>Rohale

 

The movie was top drawer. If you liked Hawthorne as Sir Humphrey in Yes Minister, his portrait of George will be a revelation. http://www.yessirnigel.com/

 

BTW, it was released in Britain as 'The Madness of George III' but retitled for U.S. distribution out of fear that American yahoos would think they had missed parts I and II, and not go see it.

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>BTW, it was released in Britain as 'The Madness of George III'

>but retitled for U.S. distribution out of fear that American

>yahoos would think they had missed parts I and II, and not go

>see it.

 

Same people who voted for George Bush in 2000 because they thought he was such a good president during his first term.

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